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Differences Between Utility And Sport Atv S

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At first glance, it's easy to tell Utility and Sport ATV's apart, and many people will eliminate one class of these quads solely on appearance. However, other than size, there are some important differences between Utility and Sport quads that you might want to take into consideration if you are looking for a new ATV, or the next time you go riding.

If you're looking to do some work, or take a quad deep into uncharted wilderness, a Utility ATV with a winch is probably the best choice for you. Although Utilities are perhaps not as extreme as a Sport quad on level ground, Utility quads can crawl over or through terrain and mud that would swallow a Sport quad alive. Although the additional size, weight, and low end torque, not to mention the optional four wheel drive, give utility quads a huge edge in dicey terrain, there are many other features that allow a Utility get through the really rough stuff. Many Utilities have a locking differential to climb out of deep mud holes and other situations where traction is a problem. The differential will either make all the wheels turn at the same speed or shift torque to the wheels that aren't slipping. Most Utility quads also have independent suspension on all four wheels, allowing it to keep in contact with the ground and keep you in control no matter where you're at. In most utilities, the suspension is tuned to give a soft and predictable ride that insulates riders from bumps in the trail. These features draw many people to Utility quads, especially if they plan on using it for hunting or work around the farm. However, many people overlook Sport quads, even though they may be more suited for their riding style.

If you want to have the power and performance to simply pull away from your buddies on the trail, or carve a corner like you never thought possible, you should try a sport quad. Sport quads are engineered for quick acceleration and bursts of speed. Sport quads are designed to be run hard for optimal performance, and can stand up to hours of high-speed riding. The gearing is aggressive and the suspension is stiff for digging into corners, which is one of the complaints that many people have about Sport quads. However, you can adjust the tension and range of your suspension to give you a stiffer or softer ride, but if you soften the ride you will inevitably get more body lean and less performance. One factor not to be overlooked is the ease of getting a Sport ATV airborne and landing it gracefully. Some people can land jumps that put them over 100 feet in the air or do a back flip with small and maneuverable Sport ATVs. Although you may not feel up to flipping an ATV under any circumstances, hitting jumps is a lot of fun once you get comfortable.

Utility quads were originally designed to be worked, but recent years have seen Utilities get a lot sportier and more suited to recreational riding. Sport quads are also getting more user friendly, which gives them more appeal. Although each category of ATV has its advantages and disadvantages, in 2006 Yamaha made a very successful attempt at bridging the gap between Sport and Utility ATV with their 450 Wolverine, which combines the best features of both classes of ATVs. It is a light ATV with sport-like handling, but it has four-wheel drive and is balanced for high speed performance, but has the comfort and low-end power for rough terrain.

Essentially, Utility and Sport quads have different angles on how to have fun off-road. Sport bikes are designed for all-out speed and handling, while utilities seem like a Cadillac in comparison-they're bigger, heavier, slower, but much more comfortable to ride. The type of ATV that is best for you will depend on your riding style, and how far you want to push you quad and what kind of obstacles you want to use to test the limits of your quad. However, with the popularity of Yahama's Wolverine, you can expect to see several crossover ATV's in the next couple years.

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Choices To Make For Your First Atv

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For whatever reason, the ATV bug has bitten you. You've seen them on television or maybe you have a couple of friends that already go riding on the trails. Day in and day out, in all kinds of weather and in every season, people are enjoying recreational ATV trail riding.

But when you're new to this activity, where to begin? What needs consideration before making a major purchase of an ATV? Do you need to take a driver's test or a safety course? Do you want the ATV for recreation or for work? Are you thinking about competitive racing?

Finally, how much is this whole venture going to cost?

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Atv Safety Training Course

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ATV trail riding is a fun and exciting sport that can provide hours of entertainment for the whole family. There is nothing like a good day on the trails, out in the sun and wind, to bring the family together or to meet up with friends or to make new ones. But ATV trail riding isn't all fun and games; there is a large degree of safety precautions involved. While you're having fun you still have to remember that you are working with a motorized vehicle and, although it is designed for recreation, that vehicle needs to be treated with the same respect and caution that you would a car or a motorcycle. For this reason, before you hop on that brand new ATV and hit the trails, you might want to consider taking an ATV safety training course.

Unlike a car or motorcycle, no license is required to operate an ATV. Many people learn how to ride from older siblings, parents or friends. While learning from friends or family isn't a bad idea overall, there might be some finer points to driving ATV's that your family or friends might have left out.

While you might find some places that will offer an ATV safety training course not all courses have certified trainers. The ATV Safety Institute (ASI) was founded in 1988 with the intent to provide a course that would educate riders about the safe operation of their vehicles and the hopes that once the students completed the course that the numbers of accidents and injuries on the ATV trails would be reduced. The idea seems to have worked, since 1984 many of the accidents involving ATV riding have been greatly reduced. ASI is also a non-profit organization.

When you purchase your ATV most of the manufacturers such as Honda, Arctic Cat, Yamaha and others will offer you the opportunity to take the ATV safety course free of charge. If you don't own an ATV and might be considering buying one for yourself or a family member, you may still take the course for a small fee. As with the Motorcycle Safety Foundation where the course provides the motorcycle, some ASI courses might include the use of ATV's donated either by manufacturers, local motor sports shops or private donors. Check with your instructors first to find out if you need your own ATV or not.

An ASI course will take you through all the basics of operating and riding an ATV and only takes half a day to complete. Certified instructors will teach you step by step each required skill in a controlled environment. You will begin with the use of proper safety equipment and how to start and stop your vehicle properly. Later on you'll move up to going up and down hills and over and around obstacles on a closed course. Each lesson builds on the previous one, becoming more of a challenge as the course goes on.

Children as young as 6 years old can take the course. There are special classes for the age group between 6 and 16 and parents are required to be present during the classes. All ASI instructors complete a broad training program and must meet all of ASI's requirements before they are allowed to call themselves a certified instructor. ASI reports that they have more than 1000 active certified instructors in more than 12000 locations across the United States. For more information or to locate a course near you, visit the ASI website at http://www.atvsafety.org/

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Why Some People Dislike Atv Riding In Nature Areas

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There has always been great debate between motor sport activists who want to enjoy riding their machines in the outdoors and other nature lovers who claim that off-road motor vehicles harm the environment and ruin the area for anyone who wants to enjoy the outdoors in other ways. The argument can be made that motorcycle and ATV riders have as much right to use state lands as anyone else, but most other outdoor activities don't interfere with riding the way riding can interfere with hiking, hunting, fishing, bird watching, or even the balance of nature and maintaining consistent flood plains. Although there may always be a conflict, understanding what other nature lovers do and how your riding affects them will help keep ATV riding in current areas, and possibly help it spread to even more areas.

The number one justification for banning ATV riding in certain areas is the detrimental affect it can have on the environment. Although ATVs smoke, are noisy, and help redistribute the mud on a piece of property, these factors have little affect on the environment. However, ATV riding, if done improperly or carelessly can damage waterways and have very noticeable effects on the local environment. The biggest and most likely risk is damage done to vegetation on the banks of waterways and nearby areas. Because those plants hold the riverbank together, if the plants are killed by riding over them, the soil in that area can be easily washed away, changing the flow of the river and oftentimes causing flooding. This kind of flooding causes damage to bottomlands, which is usually very fertile and a hotspot for deer, turkey, wild mushrooms, a plethora of wild birds, and many other things that other nature lovers seek out. In addition, increased erosion along rivers and streams cause fine sediment to fill the water, making it difficult for creatures like tadpoles and crawdads to grow and develop, which hurts the ecosystem, as well as the fish population and fishing opportunities. Most state laws do permit you to cross a river or stream on an ATV, but the most damage comes from riding up and down waterways because so much sediment is stirred up in the water.

Other than not damaging waterways and floodplains, there are several other things you can do to ensure that your riding doesn't interfere with other activities that go on alongside the trail. For the most part, you should be fine as long as you keep your riding on the trail. It is when you stray from the trail that you will bump into people who don't appreciate motor sports as much as you, and you may, in some cases, ruin their entire day. If you ride in areas that permit hunting, you should take a minute or two to find out what animals are in season so you know what else is going on in the woods. Many hunters complain of ATV riders driving by their hunting spots to see if they're having any luck. Although most hunters don't mind chatting it up, keep in mind that many hunters look forward to bagging a big deer or turkey for months, and an ATV off the trail is often enough to disrupt an animal's normal patterns and keep hunters from seeing anything. It would be the same as if you were looking forward to a riding an area, only to turn your back for a second and have a hunter ruin your trip by slashing your tires. Your day, as well as weeks or months of planning and anticipation, would be destroyed in a few short seconds. The same can be true of bird watchers, hikers, and people fishing in streams and ponds where you ride. Although you may not realize it, an ATV is a noticeable presence in the woods, and not one that all creatures, including humans, appreciate.

Although there can be some conflict between motor sports lovers and other outdoor enthusiasts, a little respect can go a long way. Also keep in mind that many people who hunt, fish, hike, etc, also ride or have ridden ATV's and vice versa. Many hunters will use ATV trails to cover ground quickly and get into areas that are usually undisturbed and catch their prey unsuspecting. Most hunters realize that deer and turkey do get used to the sight and sound of ATVs on trails. However, when you leave the trail with your ATV, you are disturbing the wildlife and possibly flood plains, which give other nature lovers and lawmakers a solid reason to restrict ATV riding to certain designated areas.

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Safety Precautions When On The Atv Trail

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Whether you are a veteran of the ATV trail or a novice rider itching to explore the great outdoors on your four-wheeler, you need to bring with you more than a little good sense and safety precautions. Without a significant amount of awareness when it comes to protecting yourself and your ATV, you could wind up injured, lost, or otherwise in bad shape.

First, it's essential that you bring a helmet with you. In many places, it's the law. Of course, there might not be other people for a hundred miles except you and your riding companions, so your initial thought process might suggest the opposite. Unless you're a top-notch prognosticator or have access to a 100% accurate crystal ball, that kind of thinking is as risky as gambling on a horse with a lame leg. It is always better to err on the side of caution and wear a protective helmet when you ride on the ATV trail.

Next, remember the adage, "Drinking and driving don't mix"? It goes for ATVs as well as automobiles, motorcycles, and boats. Even one beer has the ability to render you in a state of slowed responsiveness... and that means that a wrong turn could be the last one you ever make. Save the alcoholic beverages for the celebratory dinner or party the night after a long day of ATV trail cruising.

Make sure you consider using the "buddy system". Though there are plenty of ATV enthusiasts who head out into the mountains with nary a friend save their trusty four-wheeled playmates, it is typically not a good idea. The thinking behind this safety precaution is a reasonable one: if anything happens to you on the ATV trail, having someone else there will speed up the process of getting you to a medical facility.

Of course, it's imperative that you have your cell phone on you for your ATV rides, though you cannot always rely on it unless you have a good connection rate. Without a cellular phone, you could find yourself off a trail in no time and without a clue as to how to get in contact with anyone reliable to help you out.

If you're exploring a new ATV trail, bring along an updated map of the area. In fact, you might want to get a couple of them and make sure both you and your riding buddies each have one. Sure, it's not supposed to be cool to say, "Let's look at the map," but it's a lot better than shivering along a remote ATV trail at midnight, wondering how in the world you will make it back.

It's also important that you turn on the local weather station by the use of the radio or a television before taking a four-wheeler spin. Though most ATVs are built to handle some tricky conditions, it's best to know what kind of elements you're likely to encounter. That way you can dress appropriately, bring along suitable gear or leave the ATV riding for another day if conditions look especially dicey.

Finally, one of the most important safety precautions is to ensure that the operator of the ATV is healthy enough to navigate through the trail. If you're feeling at all ill or have a physical injury that could prevent you from being a dependable driver, you may need to head out another time. There is no shame in postponing an ATV ride if you're under-the-weather. And, besides, it's unlikely that you'll be able to enjoy the experience to its fullest if you're coughing, achy, or in pain.

By being prudent, you can ensure that your next ATV trail adventure is exciting, rewarding, and, most of all, safe.

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The Best Atv Trails

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The Best ATV Trails: One Man's Trash is Another Man's Treasure

Next time you hear about a great riding spot, you might want to ask a few questions before you pack up to go ride there. Although all ATV's are designed for fun, they aren't all set up for having fun on the same terrain, and a trail that is great for some people might be a complete bore or be impassable for others.

Twenty years ago most ATV's were fairly similar. Three wheels were a lot more common than four, and they all had a utilitarian feel to them. Today there is a huge variety of ATV's that are specifically designed to meet the needs of nearly any rider. Most ATV's have become very specialized and are designed for mud, rocks, work, or just plain speed. However, because ATV's are so specialized, certain trails are much more suited to different types of ATV's. ATV's fall into two categories, sport and utility, and each type of ATV performs extremely well in a certain conditions.

For rock crawling and other extremely rough terrain, a large four wheel drive utility quad is the best, but skid plates are highly recommended. Four wheel drive is crucial for rock crawls since it's not uncommon to get a front or back wheel off the ground in order to get from one rock to another. Although it is possible to prod a two wheel drive sport bike over some crazy rocks, you'd better take the right line through the rocks the first time since most sport bikes don't have a reverse. The suspension setups in sport bikes also make them much more difficult to get across big rocks; this is because the suspension is much more rigid, and many of them lack independent suspension. In many utility quads, it seems like the tires reach down and grab the rocks.

When it comes to mud pits, the utility quads, especially those with four wheel drive are right at home. The extra weight of these monsters, along with locking differentials, let the tires sling anything out of the way that it can't grab onto. Sport bikes can be plenty of fun in the mud, but they are not the first choice for deep mud holes. Anytime you are crossing mud, speed is your friend, especially if you're on a sport bike designed for speed and acceleration, not the low end torque need to push through a wall of mud and water. However, stopping any quad in the middle of a mud pit, four wheel drive or not, can mean getting out the tow cable or winch.

Another unexpected trail obstacle that can mean trouble is sand, especially the type of sand that is found close to creek beds. Typically you can get some decent traction on dunes, but unpacked sand is a problem for most quads, unless handled properly. In loose sand, a sport bike has the advantage over heavy utility quad. A sport bike's light weight allows it to keep moving over sand, while most utility bikes are designed to dig deeper into terrain to get traction. Regardless of what kind of quad you have, speed is the best way to overcome sand without getting stuck.

The biggest issue that comes up when talking about great riding trails is what makes that trail great. Some people will say that mostly level trails with a few hills and ditches are great riding; they just want to get away from everything and enjoy the great outdoors for a few hours. Although there are many people that enjoy this type of ATV ride, it just won't cut it if you're in the mood to sling some mud, catch some air, or crawl up bluffs. Whatever kind of riding you enjoy, you might be very disappointed if you unload at a spot and find that the terrain brings out your quad's weaknesses instead of its strengths.

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An Atv Trail Date

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The ATV trail is a place for dirt, mud, gravel and romance?

Today's ladies are hardly the proper models of the Victorian Era; in fact, there are plenty of gals out there just itching to ride their four-wheelers with as much gusto as their male counterparts. So if you're a dude who's scratching his head for the perfect place to woo your next girlfriend, why not choose an ATV trail excursion?

Of course, in order to ensure that your adventure is on the amorous side, you'll need to incorporate a little bit of heartfelt and sincere sweetness into the occasion. Start off by sending your "special friend" an invite for an ATV cruise to watch the sunset from a trail nearby. The invitation should be handwritten and sent via the mail, or, if you're cyber-savvy, emailed.

Plan your date as you would any other. First, map out the perfect ATV trail based on your companion's four-wheeling level. If she's just starting out (or hasn't ridden before), choose a smooth path that will leave her breathless and smiling, but definitely not terrified. On the other hand, if she's a veteran ATV operator, you can up the ante by picking out a more technically difficult trail filled with twists and turns. Regardless, make certain you know the mileage so you're at the appropriate spot come nightfall (a sunset always makes a lovely date backdrop.)

Because this is a date, you'll want to look your best. Though ATV riding can be a dirty proposition, a suit and tie is wildly inappropriate; however, that doesn't mean you have to show up looking like a slob. At least comb your hair and trim your fingernails. Remember to brush your teeth, too, as most people like fresh breath.

When you pick up or meet your sweet thing, show her how much you care by holding up a bag packed with plenty of goodies for the two of you to enjoy during your adventure. These could include some non-alcoholic beverages, yummy snacks, a radio or CD player for music options and a camera so you can capture your moments together.

During the ride, you'll no doubt have a plethora of opportunities to wow your significant other by pointing out exceptional scenery or by picking her a handful of wildflowers. Since this is a date, don't be in a hurry to get from point A to point B; allow yourselves to linger when feasible. And, of course, if the mood strikes, "stealing" kisses is always appropriate if mutually desired.

Should something go wrong along the way, keep yourself calm, cool and collected. Remember, this ATV trail date is about the journey, not about the destination and she'll recall fondly how you handled an unexpected situation if you keep a level head.

Though an ATV trail date of this sort isn't guaranteed to produce a relationship that will last the test of time, it's still likely to be a terrific experience for you both. You just have to put a little planning into the excursion and be open to possibilities.

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What Makes A Good Atv Trail

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There are thousands of ATV trails throughout North America (and more are being charted every day), but how do you judge whether you've found a good one or not? Here, we'll examine a few of the elements that you need to look for when deciding where to take your four-wheeled "baby" for your next pleasure cruise.

Generally, if you're someone who is familiar with four-wheeling, you'll want an ATV trail that has some length to it. Otherwise, you could risk becoming bored when you just go in circles in the same field. ATV trails can be a few to a hundred miles long; start small and gradually build up your endurance. If you're a beginner, ask a more experienced ATV operator to show you the ropes; heading out on your own is a dicey proposition and not recommended.

You want an ATV trail that matches your ability, or it won't be much fun. Thus, if you're a novice, don't start your four-wheeling hobby in an extremely mountainous region or one that requires a great deal of ATV riding know-how. Similarly, if you're someone who has a great deal of ATV operation experience, you should find a suitable trail or you'll be overcome by ennui an hour into your excursion.

One of the greatest aspects of ATV riding is enjoying the natural surroundings, so be certain that your next trail ride is one that includes some amazing views or which allows you to soak in the beauty of the area. Remember you don't have to be a photographer, an artist or a poet to be moved by a snaking stream or a radiant sunrise.

Not sure if a trail or area is open to ATV travelers? Then stop before gunning your motor and don't ride on any trail or in any region until you have been given the "okay" by either the property owner or a legal authority. Far too many four-wheeling enthusiasts have given the sport a bad name by ripping through private property or tearing up national parks. There are plenty of legal ATV trails out there; make sure the one you choose is on the up-and-up or you could be hammered with a heavy fine.

The last thing you want is to get lost during an ATV trail ride. Riding without the proper gear while outside in the elements can be uncomfortable, scary, and deadly in some situations. Therefore, if you're unfamiliar with your ATV trail, make sure you obtain a map of the region so you can stay aware of your bearings. Even if you never need to glance at the map, it's still better to have it than to end up wondering, "Where the heck am I?" while a dark night approaches.

Finally, one of the most important elements of a great ATV trail is that it is one you want to share with friends and other riders. You will know you've found an awesome path when you can't wait to get on your blog and start bragging about your recent excursion to other four-wheeling adventurers. After all, when you've found something that's really exciting, it's up to you to share the news with your friends all over the world.

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Atv History

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The ATVs (all terrain vehicles) we know today had very humble beginnings in the mountainous farming regions of Japan. The muddy mountain roads became difficult for the farmers to travel during spring thaws and were almost impossible to drive over with conventional vehicles or big machinery. The Japanese, always a culture to modify and tinker with something until they could improve it, created the three wheeled ATV. This vehicle did wonders for helping the local farmers. The ATVs were less expensive than the larger farm vehicles and it proved to be an excellent little workhorse.

The Japanese didn't stop there, though. ATV manufacturers took it a step further and realized that they could market these ATVs to Americans. America had nothing like the ATV and the first ATV arrived on our shores in the early 1970's. Honda was the forerunner of the ATV, and had a proven track record with motorcycle sales in America, having introduced the Honda Cub to millions of Americans only a decade before. The successful marketing slogan "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" came at a time when bikers had a bad reputation and proved to people that the average Joe could enjoy motor sports as well. By the 1970's, Honda had a reputation for building reliable, state of the art machines and their ATV was no different. This time the marketing scheme would be to show people how thrilling recreational ATV riding could be.

Over thirty years ago the Honda US90 made its debut and was called the ATC90. Oddly enough, the initial intent of the ATVs may have started out at the opposite end of the spectrum from Japan's working class ATV, but in the end the results were the same. After gaining popularity as a recreational vehicle, the ATV soon became popular as a working vehicle as Americans began to realize exactly how versatile this little three-wheeled vehicle could be.

The ATV proved to have several advantages for the working class man. First and foremost, the ATV was cheaper to operate than a tractor or pickup truck and during the gas crunch of the 70's that was a big plus. The ATV was also easier to maneuver in tight spots and could travel over practically any type of terrain. The only problem people found was the tires. The tires of earlier ATVs were low-pressure and while this worked fine on mud or sand, the tires punctured easily when going over sharper terrain, like a harvested field or sharp rocks. Overall, the ATV did work that no other piece of heavy equipment could do. The original tires weren't repairable either.

In 1975 the hubless wheel design was replaced with steel hubs and a wheel lined with a tough fabric on the inside. More durable plastic fenders were added. This time they produced fenders in bright colors for better visibility out in the bush. As the ATV's popularity grew the Japanese engineers didn't stop their research and development. They had a good thing going and they were determined to make it better. Their engineers went into the field to see how the ATV's performed and started gathering data to help with the next round of modifications.

By the 1980's, ATVs had gone the same route as dirt bikes and motorcycles. The ATV's were being used as a utility vehicle and for racing. More and more people were buying ATV's for riding off road trails and competing in races similar to motocross events. By 1985 ATV usage had gone from only 30% in the 70's to the whopping 80%. In the 1988, Honda made another groundbreaking leap with the ATV's design, the introduced the FourTrax 300 and a second model called the FourTrax 300 4×4. Up until this point the ATV still had the three wheels, now Honda added an extra wheel and gave the ATV four wheel drives, which provided more stability and power. They also fitted the FourTrax with a four stroke single cylinder engine which was air cooled and gave it a five speed transmission, automatic clutch and a maintenance free drive shaft. Honda also thought to give the FourTrax an extra low gear for hauling particularly heavy objects as big as 850 lbs.

Today, ATV's are fully ingrained into our way of living. You can find ATVs on the dirt bike trails, on farms, on construction sites and a host of other places. Now countries all over the world are discovering the same thing Americans have; the ATV is a fun and efficient vehicle for handling a wide array of jobs in almost any environment.

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