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Yacht Charter In The Central Cyclades

(category: Boating, Word count: 1233)
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The areas prevailing wind during the summer months is the infamous Meltemi blowing from the N-NW. It is first felt in June and becomes stronger through July, August and September when it can reach force 8. It dies down in October. In the spring and autumn gales are common from the N and the SE. The summer months are hot, average temperatures are 25 deg C and temperatures often reach 35 deg C.

Milos is the southwesternmost of the Cyclades. A large bay, Ormos Milou, was scooped out when an ancient volcano erupted and hot sulphur springs still exist today. Adhamas is the island's port Go bow or stern to the E side of the ferry pier or bow to the smaller pier to the E. It is also possible to anchor off to the SE of the short pier. The bottom is mud rocks and weed and poor holding in places. There is good shelter from the Meltemi but winds from the south can produce dangerous conditions. There is water on the ferry pier and fuel can be delivered. Most provisions can be obtained in the village and there are some tavernas. Climb the hill to the Chora at Milos for breathtaking views across the bay. There are several other anchorages in the bay that are exposed to the north. There are no facilities at any of them. Apollonia is in the NE of Milos. Go bow or stern to the pier or anchor of the beach. Holding is good on a sandy bottom. There are tavernas and a mini market ashore. Ormos Voudhia lies one mile to the south of Apollonia. There is good shelter from the Meltemi but the surroundings are unattractive with open cast mines and a wharf and ore carrier all in view.

Kimilos lies to the NE of Milos. There are two anchorages in Ormos Sikia in the SW of the island. They are exposed to the N - NW and unsuitable when the Meltemi is blowing. Pirgonisi is a long sandy beach on the south coast and yachts can anchor almost anywhere along it in attractive surroundings. Good holding on sand and weed. Psathi lies further along the coast to the east. Go bows to the quay or anchor off. There is little shelter from the Meltemi and yachts are advised to use this anchorage only in calm weather. There are a couple of tavernas ashore and limited provisions can be obtained in the village. Just to the north is Semina Creek and yachts can anchor in the bay. Like Psathi, there is little shelter from the Meltemi and Psathi should be used only in calm weather.

The in the NW of island of Poliagos there is a lovely secluded anchorage just to the south of the tiny island of Moanolsi. There is shelter from the Meltemi and good holding on the sandy bottom. On the south side of the island there are several coves that yachts can anchor in when conditions are calm.

Folegandros is another barren, rocky island with exception of the small Chora in the NE that lies among green trees and shrubs. The island's ferry port is Karavostasi. Go bow or stern to the mole on the south side of the arm extending westward. There is poor holding in places on sand and rock. There is reasonable shelter from the Meltemi. There are several tavernas but provisions can be difficult to obtain and the island is totally reliant on deliveries by ferry. On the W side of Folegandros is the large bay, Ormos Vathi. It can only be used in calm weather and there is poor holding in places on sand and weed.

Sikinos lies to the E of Folegandros. Ormos Skala is the only harbour on the island. Yachts can go alongside the quay or anchor off. There are tavernas ashore and some provisions can be obtained. The setting is attractive and popular with Greek tourists.

3.5 miles to the east of Sikinos lies Ios. It is claimed Homer is buried here. He died aboard a ship on passage from Samos to Athens and his body was thrown overboard and later washed up on Ios. Go bow or stern to in the harbour of Port Ios. There is excellent holding in mud. A mini tanker can deliver fuel and water is available from a public fountain in the square. There are tavernas all around the harbour and most provisions can be obtained. The resort is popular with the young and most of the bars play loud music in the evenings/night. Ormos Milopotamou lies to the S of Port Ios. In the north of the bay there are 4 coves where yachts can anchor, the easterly two provide the best shelter. Holding is good on sand. There are tavernas and hotels on the beach. Ormos Manganari is a large bay on the south coast of Ios, it is possible to anchor throughout the bay with good holding on sand. There are tavernas ashore.

Thira is similar to Milos in as much as it is a volcano and when it erupted in 1440 - 1450 BC it created the bay as it is today. The close lying islands of Thirasia, Nea Kammeni and Palaia Kammeni are also part of this huge volcanic structure. Around the basin, on cliffs 300m high you will see white Cycladic houses with blue painted windows hanging from black volcanic rocks which rise sheer from the sea all group together to make Thira is one of the most popular destinations in Greece.

Finikia lies in the N of Thira. Anchor to the W of the mole in 10 -20m with a trip line because the bottom is rocky. Limited shelter from the Meltemi and completely open to the S. Skala Thira is the harbour of the island's capital on the steep slopes above. Go bow or stern to the quay with a line to the large mooring buoy. Departing is difficult with the confusion of the many lines attached to the buoy and it is recommended that yachts are not left unattended. There is water on the quay and several tavernas in the harbour.

On the coast south of Ak Akrotiri there are a number of anchorages that provide good shelter from the Meltemi. The bottom is good holding in sand but there is often some ground swell that causes yachts to roll badly. Monolithos is a small harbour on the E coast. Go bows to the breakwater near its extremity with a long line. There is a taverna and showers ashore.

Thirasia is the westernmost island and the only anchorage is Ayios Nikolaos. Yachts can anchor off but the small pier is reserved for local boats. There are tavernas ashore and some provisions are available in the village atop the cliffs.

Nea Kammeni has a number of small inlets where a yacht can anchor. A trip line should be used as the bottom is strewn with rocks that are likely to snag an anchor. Nea Kammeni is known for it's problem with large rats and there are many reports of the getting aboard yachts.

Anafi is the southernmost of the Cyclades. It has one anchorage on the S coast that is exposed. The island is barren and parched and you will not miss a lot if you choose not to visit.

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How To Launch Your Boat

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Launching your boat will become a simple task with a little practice. However, if you are new to boating you might want to hitch up your boat trailer and head to an empty parking lot to gain some practice. I don't recommend arriving at the boat ramp and attempting to launch your boat before you know how to reverse a trailer.

So, let's look at some of the principles of reversing a trailer ...

Start with your vehicle and the trailer as straight as possible and about a trailer's length from the area into which you want to reverse. Watch the trailer out of the driver's window while reversing slowly, and start turning the steering wheel to the right. Be gentle with the steering - it is easier to add more steering than to correct it too much. Some guides to reversing suggest grasping the steering wheel at the very bottom. This should prevent you from over-turning the wheel and if your steering wheel is in a straight position to start with, you will know throughout the reversing maneuver, without having to look, that at the lowest point your steering wheel is again straight.

As soon as the trailer starts to turn you can begin straightening up while still reversing. Don't leave straightening up too late or the trailer will jackknife.

Eventually you begin steering in the other direction while still reversing. Bring the vehicle's nose around to follow the trailer and keep an eye on where the trailer is in case it needs correction.

Continue to reverse in a straight line using the side mirrors. Reverse slowly and carefully. When more of the trailer appears in one mirror, steer towards that mirror to start the trailer going the other way. Remember that a correction only requires a small steering movement.

Pulling forward to straighten the trailer is often an easy option before continuing to reverse.

Once you are able to back up a few hundred feet without jackknifing your trailer or rear-ending anything you are probably ready to launch your boat at a boat ramp. If possible, select a quiet weekday morning for your first launch.

The first rule when launching a boat is being prepared before you pull onto the launching ramp. That means having all your gear safely stowed, the boat key in the ignition, the boat drain plug in, the tie-down straps off, the trailer lights disconnected and a safety line connected to the boat's bow. It can be very frustrating watching someone loading fishing or picnic gear into their boat or apply sunscreen to their kids while their boat is parked on the launch ramp!

Keep the trailer's winch strap and safety chain connected until you reach the water's edge. It will only take a few seconds to disconnect them prior to launching.

Back the boat down the launch ramp and stop before the stern of the boat hangs over the water. Unlock the winch strap and remove pins or other devices used to prevent the outboard motor from tipping down. Now back the boat down until the trailer wheels are submerged.

When the boat is ready to float off the trailer, have your boating buddy hold the bowline or tie the line to your vehicle or winch handle.

Once the boat has floated free of the trailer either beach the boat or tie it off to the dock with the bowline. A confident boater will have someone start the motor and move the boat away from the dock until the driver has parked the vehicle and is ready to board.

Either way, try to launch quickly as a courtesy to your fellow boaters.

The same rules apply when putting your boat back onto the trailer, but there are a few hazards you should be aware of, especially if you're tired or feeling rushed.

When you tie up at the dock, have your vehicle keys in your pocket, retrieve your vehicle and claim a spot in line.

Before you pull your boat out of the water ensure the engine has been tilted up.

Many launching problems will be avoided by making sure everything on your boat is in working order before you leave home!

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Towable Tubing Tips How To Get The Most Out Of Your Towables

(category: Boating, Word count: 655)
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Few watersports offer such sheer enjoyment as boat tubing. And the great thing is that it's so easy compared to, say, water skiing. This ease makes it suitable for all age groups and so a great activity for the whole family. Easy as it is, however, you need to take some precautions. Here a some pointers on how you can get the most out of your towable tubing experience.

First, let's look at what towables are. Essentially, the towing experience involves being pulled behind a boat in or on one of various types of "towables." These boat towables can take a variety of forms but tubes are the most popular (like water ski tubes). Tubes come in a vast range of shapes and sizes, so our first tip is about buying your tube and the rope that connects it to the boat.

Towables are made of artificial fibres such as nylon, polyester, PVC or neoprene. Polyester is the most durable while neoprene is the most comfortable and most expensive. If you have kids, you might prefer the latter.

Next there's the matter of shape. Towables come in a wide range of shapes and sizes. The original design is the donut shape. This is most suitable for adults who can sit on top. However it's not so convenient for smaller people to sit on. Plus the donut rolls over easily making it unsuitable for young children.

Then there are deck tubes which are flat and delta shaped. These are great for multiple riders. These can flip over easily so they're most suitable for teenagers and young adults.

Next we have 'ride in' and 'ride on' tubes. The former are like small boats and so are perfect for small children and those requiring a gentler experience. 'Ride ons' are long narrow towables. Sometimes called torpedo style, these can sit up to six riders. So they're great for groups of young riders seeking speed and thrills.

Finally for extreme thrills there are the rocker towables which have wings. These are examples of concept tubes which are aimed at the thrillseeker.

As for the ropes that connect the towable to the boat, these are graded according to the number of riders allowed. Towable ropes should be 50 and 65 feet in length.

Now that you've bought your towable and rope, it's time to look at some tips for using them. First, always check any warning indicators on the tube. Read and obey the manufacturer's specifications on such factors as the number of riders, their maximum size and weight, and the recommended top speed limits. Then the tubers should be instructed into how to position themselves on the tube. Don't forget they must always wear a personal floatation device while in the water.

The next thing to do is to find the right area of water for towing. To be safe, you should allow at least 100-feet of unobstructed water on either side of the boat and a minimum of 3000 feet in front. Aside from the driver, the boat should have a 'spotter' to check for riders who fall off. The spotter can then alert other boats in the area by waving a flag.

It's essential too that the boat handler be familiar with any regulations affecting that stretch of water you're on. Speed limits are influenced by water conditions. Wakes for example can be dangerous for towing so boat speeds should be reduced. And he must keep in mind the capabilities of the riders on the tube he's towing. There are various speed limits that apply to riders of different ages, for example.

If you follow these simples tips, you'll be assured of a safe and fun towable session. Towables, whether marine towables or freshwater, offer a genuine water sports experience for the whole family. In fact perfect activity for large groups of all kinds.

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The Benefits Of Desalination Systems

(category: Boating, Word count: 523)
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Water provides so many benefits to people's lives and to the various things they use in their home, at work or in their businesses. However, it's not always that we get pure, clean water for personal, commercial or industrial use. And this is the reason why we have today water makers such marine water makers, water purification and commercial sea water desalination systems to help us enjoy clean and potable water in our daily lives.

At home, people normally use the portable water purifiers or water makers. This is an important device especially for families with babies who are very particular about the water they drink every day. Purified drinking water can be achieved in three levels depending on the consumers' needs. Minimally purified water makes use of a carbon filter, partially purified water utilizes the reverse osmosis system while steam distillation along with carbon pre-filtration is done to achieve a completely purified water. It is important to note, though, that the type of water purifier a family needs may depend on the area they live in as water sources also vary from one location to another.

Marine water makers, on the other hand, are vital to boats and other sea vessels. This device utilizes a desalination system or the reverse osmosis desalinator which allows sea water to be free from salt and other minerals for use when the boats are running. This is not very costly to use and in fact can save time and money.

Desalinators on board benefits boat owners in several ways. First, they provide natural water that makes cleaning boats hassle free and leaves their boat spotless thereby protecting the rigging and hull. Secondly, with marine water makers, the boat owner doesn't need to buy purified water so it saves him money. Thirdly, with a desalinator on board the boat, there's no need to store gallons of water which may only put on much weight on the vessel and increase fuel consumption. Finally, fresh and potable water can readily be available on board for use in cooking, washing the dishes, ice making, bathing or doing the laundry.

Water makers have the reverse osmosis method as their common factor in purifying water. The reverse osmosis system dates back 50 years ago and was originally developed to produce clean water for industrial use. By theory, it is considered the most extensive way to purify huge amounts of water. It is often used in residential and commercial water filtration.

A reverse osmosis desalinator removes the salt from seawater to make is safe to drink. Its purification process entails high mechanical pressure to force the water through a semi-permeable membrane which rids the water of algae and other minerals. The membrane used here is quite advanced as it can actually extract pure water from salty borewater, seawater and even recycled water. In other words, when water passes through the membrane at high pressure, only the water molecules go through it and no other substances. So this only means that with a reverse osmosis desalinator, people can have all the fresh water they need.

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Evaluating A Coastal Cruiser

(category: Boating, Word count: 816)
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Going coastal? You have abundant choices in boats

Because coastal-cruising sailors are most often sailing on tight schedules, using their boats for only a day or two or, at most, a week or two at a time, the first thing they need to consider when choosing a new boat is its speed. Not that this is the only criterion, but the faster the boat, the larger your cruising ground. On a coast where harbors and anchorages are few and far between, a slow, heavy vessel will not prove much fun. Unless you live in an area where places to pull in are only a few miles apart, it is wise to look for something that can average at least 5 knots under both sail and power if it's a smaller vessel - say, 32 feet and under - and at least 6 to 7 knots if it's a larger vessel. Usually this means you'll be favoring a lighter boat with a fin keel and spade rudder over a heavier boat with a fuller underbody.

Because coastal-cruising boats are not as likely to be caught out in bad weather for extended periods, their construction need not meet offshore standards. Any of the popular mass-produced boats currently on the market should be more than adequate in terms of strength. Because coastal boats do tend to spend a lot of time tied up to docks, you may wish to focus on amenities. A substantial AC shore-power system is usually a critical item and will go a long way toward making your boat as comfortable as your home, allowing you to enjoy microwaves, hair driers, air conditioning, televisions, and other luxuries without installing such impedimenta as generators, huge battery banks, and inverters. Nor do you need big tanks. Capacities of as little as 20 gallons of fuel and 50 of water, given a mid-size boat between 30 and 40 feet, should be adequate in most cases.

Otherwise, what constitutes a well-equipped coastal cruiser varies by location. A boat based in colder, more northern waters will get a lot more use if it has a sheltered cockpit and a good heater on board. Likewise, a boat in the sunny south will need good ventilation and a good bimini to keep its crew happy. The same goes for the sail inventory. If light winds predominate, you will need a big genoa, probably a spinnaker or drifter, and a lightweight main. If your cruising ground sees a lot of heavy air, you'll need smaller, tougher sails. In all cases, you'll want a roller-reefing headsail with a sunstrip (so you can leave it bent on when the boat is idle) and a mainsail cover that is easy to put on and remove. The faster you can get under way, the more you will use the boat. Charles J. Doane

Performance cruisers

I've already urged you to favor faster boats over slower boats when shopping for a coastal cruiser. Here's an even more radical suggestion: How about getting a boat that's really, really fast? For a certain sort of sailor, particularly one who likes to both race and cruise, the temptation to favor speed above all else will be irresistible. If you are one of these, you'll need to keep a few things in mind.

Lesson number one: You can't have it all. There is a decided trend among many production-boat builders these days to enlarge a boat's accommodations at the expense of its performance potential. There are still several boats that favor the performance end of the spectrum, but that almost always means sacrificing accommodation space. The extreme examples here are the smaller coastal trimarans and catamarans on the market. These boats are a total blast to sail and can easily top 10 knots under sail, but the living space and amenities down below are definitely minimal - though multihulls do have lots of deck space to play on. Faster boats (at least when it comes to monohulls) also tend to be deeper boats. This will limit your ability to explore shoal-draft cruising grounds.

Lesson number two: Fast is more expensive. Performance boats are often built of high-tech lightweight materials; their rigs and sail inventories are also more sophisticated. Many now sport retractable bowsprits that facilitate the setting of large asymmetric spinnakers. All this costs money. Such boats also tend to demand more maintenance. If speed is what most thrills you, you'll need to spend more time fairing the bottom and keeping it clean, overhauling winches, and so on.

Lesson number three: If you want to race as well as cruise, be sure to do some research. Simply getting the fastest boat you can afford may not be the best way to find the best action. Check to see which types of boats are most commonly raced in your area so you can be sure of finding some interesting competition.

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Having Difficulty Finding Crewed Yacht Charters Book Online

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Crewed yacht charters are easy to find when you do a search on the Internet. These charters are available all over the world. Once you find the yacht charter company you want to deal with, the process of booking the sailing yacht and charter is relatively simple. First of all you have to decide where you want to travel this year and when you type the sailing destination into your Search engine browser the wealth of crewed yacht charters that result are absolutely amazing.

The location you choose for the crewed yacht charter is the most important part of the booking process. Once you know where it is you want to go, the rest of the procedure of booking online will fall into place. For example, you can choose crewed yacht charters to the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the Bahamas or even the French Riviera. The type of crewed sailing yacht you choose can also be different. You can choose a luxury sailing yacht, a powerboat or a catamaran depending on your individual preference for sailing.

A crewed sailing yacht includes the captain and the crew, who will take care of all your needs while you are on board the yacht. You do not have to worry about handling the yacht when you book crewed yacht charters, but you can take advantage of the opportunity to learn more about sailing. The crew has the knowledge you need to enjoy the best scenic locations, the best spots for diving or fishing and the best ports for shopping. The captain is responsible to ensuring the safety of everyone on board the crewed yacht charter and this will be uppermost in his mind at all times.

The all-inclusive crewed yacht charters include everything you need to make the most of your vacation. All the food and drink as well as equipment is included in the price. The only extra costs that you will incur are your shopping and dining experiences in the various ports of call. You won't have to worry about ant anchorage fees or have to supply your own food. Even the chef to cook exquisite delicacies for you comes as part of a crewed yacht charter.

The rates of crewed yacht charters depend on the number of passengers, the size of the boat and the length of the charter. The time of the year also affects the cost, as winter is a more expensive time of year to book a crewed sailing yacht than summer. You should also consider having travel insurance for a crewed yacht charter, just as you would if you planned a trip to a resort destination. Even though the crew is vigilant when it comes to the safety of passengers on crewed yacht charters, accidents can happen at any time.

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Where Can You Travel With Yacht Charters Greece Is Waiting For You To Explore

(category: Boating, Word count: 472)
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In the world of yacht charters, Greece is one of the most exotic destinations you can choose. Enjoy bareboat sailing on the Ionian Sea along the west coast of Greece where the islands are bound together by a unique culture. Another yacht charter that Greece offers is a chance to see the varied landscape of the islands in the Saronic Gulf. Take trip back to the place where civilization began when you choose one of these yacht charters. Greece has so much to offer that you will hardly know where to begin.

The Saronic Gulf offers exciting ports of call for yacht charters. You have the opportunity for you to charter a yacht on your own and enjoy bareboat sailing. Greece also offers luxury yachts with a full crew to pamper you as you sail along. Whatever your penchant for yacht charters, Greece will meet or beat your expectations giving you a vacation like none other. In addition to the Ionian Sea and the Saronic Gulf, with yacht charters along the coast of Greece, you can sail to the Cyclades Group of islands, the Dodecanese, the Sporades and the Samos area.

For those interested in bareboat sailing, Greece has many types of yachts available, such as sailing yachts and motor yachts. In order to book one of these yacht charters, Greece requires that there be two qualified skippers on board. This is because if one should have an accident, the other can handle the yacht. Greece also requires that skippers be licensed for sailing and you have to mail a copy of your sailing license to the yacht charter company when you make your booking. Don't forget to bring your original contract for the yacht charter. Greece regulations require this for departure clearance.

Yacht charters in Greece begin on Saturday afternoon and end on Friday evening. The yacht charter company that you choose will also arrange for transfer for you from the airport to the yacht and provide the same service when the charter is complete. With a yacht charter in Greece, you will have to choose an itinerary from a list provided. It is unlikely that you will be able to change the schedule of ports of call.

When you book yacht charters, Greece regulations require that the yacht be full of fuel and water you will need for the trip. There are refuelling stations in the various ports and you must return the yacht in the same way you receive it. The charter company can advise you on what type of clothing to bring with you for yacht charters. Greece can get cold when you are on the water and at night. This is why it is recommended that you bring heavy clothes.

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Find Your Client A Private Yacht Charter

(category: Boating, Word count: 582)
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Have you ever had a booking catastrophe turn GOLDEN?

An August news flash via one of our daily emails alerted me of a "situation" in Europe with the Windjammer vessels. Apparently they were being held in port for non-payment of various bills, and I diligently forwarded this press release to my client, who had been booked for a January 2008 cruise with Windjammer for some time. Not only had we deposited $1,500 for three cabins, but we had pre-paid the hotel stay as well! I was very concerned when my call to the company went unanswered.

As my client was concerned enough to decide to cancel his vacation, I went to work quickly attempting to rescue him, as he and his wife, an adult son and his wife, and another son had arranged flights into St. Martin and home from Tortola. NOW what?

Google to the rescue! I plugged in "yacht charters", discovered there were several different brokers we could consider from Tortola, and I quickly emailed several of them. As is often the case (we should all make note of this in our OWN business!), the first responder got my attention that day. Lynne Campbell of Carefree Yacht Charters was going to be my "lifesaver!"

What fun! I asked my client, Steve, if he would consider a sailboat charter, and he hesitated. "My wife and daughter-in-law are both worried about seasickness," he replied quickly. "Let me see what they say about that."

While Lynne worked quickly on her end to see which yachts were available, the next email from Steve revealed that the girls were a "GO!" I was VERY excited, and let Lynne know immediately that the client was game.

We discussed the fact that perhaps a catamaran-style boat would suit this family's needs best, but Lynne also explained that the classic sailing experience found aboard a mono hull-style yacht might be an excellent option as well. Not only did she discuss this with me, but she was more than happy to talk directly with my client in order to answer questions, address concerns, and help determine the best boat and crew for this particular vacation - which turned out to be a mono hull in this case!

Carefree Yacht Charters takes care of EVERY detail. I can't tell you how many amazing amenities these boats have, right down to the great water toys. Of course, each yacht is unique, just as each crew is different. Some have just one crew member who acts as both captain and chef, while others have two or even more.

A yacht charter typically includes ALL alcoholic beverages and meals, and the course is often charted according to the clients preferences! A client preference request form is sent to the clients in advance of the charter so that all their requests and requirements are met. The price is NOT much more than the cost of a Windjammer or big-ship cruise. In fact, this family is bringing six people for just over $10,000, plus the customary 15 percent tip to the crew.

I need to share with you that Lynne and her husband owned and operated two successful yacht charters in the Virgin Islands for twelve years, so they are really well equipped to organize and book your clients vacations. And I can't WAIT to hear the stories when my clients return from this adventure. And, to think it all came about because of a potential cancellation!

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Sea Kayak Accessories Essential And Fun Accessories For Kayakers

(category: Boating, Word count: 400)
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Sea Eagle.com is well known for their inflatable whitewater and ocean kayaks. The manufacturer offers a complete line of sea kayak accessories. Some of these accessory items are essential for your safety on the ocean or whitewater trips, others fit into the 'fun' category.

Some of the most common inflatable ocean kayak accessory items include:

Life jackets and paddling vests - Coast Guard approved PFDs are a must for owners of inflatable boats and kayaks.

Inflator pump - You can inflate your sea kayak with a hand operated pump. A 110 V high volume inflator/deflator makes the job easier and faster.

Repair kit for kayaks - This is an essential accessory item in case the kayak develops a leak. The kit contains two patches of the hull material, glue and a valve replacement tool.

Bilge pump - A high volume hand operated bilge pump is essential for getting the water out of the inflatable when on the water.

Storage bags for bow and stern - Great boating accessories for storing your supplies and gear.

Kayak carry bag - Deflate and roll up the inflatable sea kayak, then place it on the bag and wrap the bag around it for easy storage.

Seats - It's nice to have a seat with a back rest in your ocean kayak for long paddling or rowing. These Deluxe seats are very comfortable

Although there are many more types of accessories you can get for your inflatable ocean kayak, this will give you an idea of what is available.

The most important accessory on the above list is the life jacket or personal flotation device (PFD). A PFD is not considered an accessory for any boat, whether it is an ocean kayak or a dinghy. It is an essential part of any sea kayaking equipment and you should never go out in any inflatable without wearing a Coast Guard approved life vest.

The second most important inflatable boat accessory is your hull repair kit. Although Sea Eagle has a small patch kit for minor repairs there is a better inflatable ocean kayak repair kit available for bigger jobs from Tuff Coat. Most if not all of these boating accessories can be bought from the manufacturer or retailer where you bought the kayak.

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