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Cats And Ring Worm

(category: Cats, Word count: 458)
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Ringworm is a very common form of skin disease that is found in both dogs and cats. Although its name makes you think otherwise, this skin disease isn't caused by any type of worm. It's actually caused by fungi known as Dermatophytes that feed on dead tissues found in the surface of the skin, spreading them around the skin of the animal.

With cats, there is a certain type of fungi known as M Canis that is found with nearly 95% of all ringworm cases. Normally, cats will get the ringworm disease from contaminated objects like bedding, clippers, or another animal that already has the disease. If there are animals in your home or around your house that have the ringworm disease, your cat could very easily contract it this way.

If you have kittens or cats that are under a year old in your home, you should always use precaution, as they are more susceptible to ringworm. Kittens can easily contract the disease, especially if you allow them to go outside. They can easily come in contact with a contaminated object or another cat that has the disease. Kittens take a long time to build their immune system up, and in the meantime they are more apt to get common disease such as ringworm.

The most common symptoms of ringworm in cats are rough or broken hairs, or hair loss around the head or the paws. Ringworm can easily be identified by a patch of scaly skin on the body that appears itchy and inflamed. There will also be broken hairs around the patch of scaly skin. This area is very sensitive, and you should never try to touch it, as it will hurt your cat.

If you notice any of the above symptoms with your pet, you should immediately schedule an appointment with your vet. If the vet diagnosis your cat with ringworm, he may prescribe ointment or tablets. What he describes however, will determine on how serious the ringworm is. If he prescribes tablets to your cat, you should give them with meals. Ointment on the other hand, is normally spread into the coat, topically. You should always use what your vet prescribes on a daily basis, to ensure that your cat heals. The healing process will take time, normally around six weeks or more.

Cats that have ringworm should be labeled as infectious. If you have children in the house, you should keep them away from your pet. Whenever you handle your cat, you should always use gloves. Ringworms are contagious, and you should always use caution. Even though it's a mild disease, ringworm can result in serious problems due to the slow recovery time and fact that it's contagious.

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Tips For Stopping Spraying

(category: Cats, Word count: 474)
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Anytime your cat backs himself up to a door or other object in your house, lifts his tail, and releases urine - you have a problem. This problem is known as spraying, and is very common with cats kept indoors. Even though it is a very annoying problem, it's a problem that can be solved.

Contrary to what many think, spraying isn't a litter box problem, but rather a problem with marking. Cat urine that is sprayed contains pheromones, which is a substance that cats and other animals use for communicating. Pheromones are much like fingerprints with humans, as they are used to identify the cat to other animals.

When a cat sprays something, he is simply marking his territory through his urine. The spraying is simply the cat's way of letting others know that the territory is his. Even though it may make you mad and annoy you, getting angry with your cat will solve nothing. If you raise your voice or show angry towards your cat, it can very well result in more spraying.

Cats that are in heat are easily attracted to the odor of urine. For cats in heat, spraying is more or less an invitation for love. Often times cats that spray while in heat results in a litter of kittens that are born in just a few short months. Keep in mind that cats not only spray during heat, as some will also spray during encounters with other cats, or when they are feeling stressed.

Although spraying is a way of communicating for cats, the smell for people is horrible. The good thing here is that most cats will do a majority of their spraying outdoors. If you have an indoor cat that never goes outside, spraying can indeed be a problem. If you've noticed spraying in your home, you should take action and do something about it immediately.

The most effective and also the easiest way to stop spraying is to have your cat either neutered or spayed, which of course depends on the sex. Most male cats that have been neutered will stop spraying the same day they have the surgery. If you don't want to get your cat neutered or spayed, you should look into other options. If you hope to one day breed your cat, you certainly don't want to have him neutered or spayed.

The best thing to do in this situation is to talk to your veterinarian. He will be able to give you advice, and possibly even solve the problem without having surgery. There may be a medical problem present that is causing the problem, which your vet can identify. You should always do something about spraying the moment it starts - simply because cat urine stinks and it can leave stains all over your home.

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Cats And Feline Diabetes

(category: Cats, Word count: 465)
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Cats are one of the most popular pets in North America. They are loving pets, capable of providing you years of companionship. Like other pets, cats can sometimes get sick. There are several different types of ailments that cats can get, one of which is feline diabetes. Feline diabetes is a serious disease, although it can be treated by a veterinarian.

Diabetes is more common with humans than with cats or other animals. The cause of diabetes is actually quite simple. Sugar, or glucose, is found in the blood. The level of blood sugar in the body or the animal is kept under control by hormone insulin, which the pancreas produces. When the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, diabetes is to blame.

The symptoms of feline diabetes will vary. The most common symptoms include an increase in urine and an increase in thirst. Other symptoms of feline diabetes include a loss of appetite, weight loss, and a poor coat. An increase in thirst is easy to detect, as you can easily notice the water dish empty throughout the day.

If you don't get your cat treated for feline diabetes immediately, the cat will eventually become inactive, vomit on a regular basis, and eventually fall into a coma. On the other hand, if you get the diabetes treated in time, the cat will more than likely lead a normal and healthy life. Keep in mind that treatment doesn't happen overnight - it takes time and dedication.

Cats that have feline diabetes will need to be given food at the same time every day. They should be prevented from going outside as well. If your cat has diabetes, you'll need to give him insulin shots once or twice or a day. Once your veterinarian checks your cat, he will tell you how many shots and how much insulin you need to give your cat.

Before you give your cat his insulin shot, you should always make sure that he has some food first. If he hasn't eaten and you give him a shot anyway, he could end up with a hypoglycemic shock. This can also occur from too much insulin as well. A hypo can be really dangerous, and should be avoided at all costs. If your cat gets a hypoglycemic shock and you aren't around, he may end up dying.

If you have to give insulin shots to your cat due to feline diabetes, you should always keep a watchful eye on him after you have administered the shot. After your cat has been on insulin for a period of time, your vet may reduce the amount of insulin. Even though he may have to stay on insulin the rest of his life, he will lead an otherwise healthy life.

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The Cat Whisperer

(category: Cats, Word count: 460)
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A cat whisper is somewhat similar to a dog or horse whisperer, although cat whisperers relate quite well with cats. These types of people are unusually lucky and very successfully with cats. In most cases, a cat will be abandoned or just show up at someone's door. In this event, the cat will adopt this individual as the cat whisperer.

Often times, alley cats and black cats will show up at someone's door and decide to move into their homes. This can be a result of abandonment, or the cat's family moving away and simply leaving the cat behind. Sometimes, the cat may decide that he likes someone else's home better and decide to move there instead of staying with his owner.

A lot of people will tell you that a cat whisperer can be thought of as a therapist for cats. Almost all cat whisperers haven't have any type of training, what they know just seems to come to them naturally. These types of people understand the way a cat thinks and knows how to work with the cat to achieve the results they want. Even though many think of a cat whisperer as a therapist, it actually couldn't be further from the truth.

Cats who have been abused or mistreated, often times won't respond to anyone but a cat whisperer. Although others may have tried to help the cat, it will only make matters worse by making the cat feel scared and afraid. In most cases, these cats will end up in a pound. This is very tragic, as the cats have already endured more than they ever should have. A majority of the cats who have been abused were once loved pets. Along the way, they were abandoned, mistreated, attacked by dogs, and in some cases tortured.

Cats who have been treated unfairly often times won't trust anyone. They are often times confused, in a lot of pain, and not sure what they should do. Like humans, cats feel pain. Those that have been physically abused are a sad sight indeed. Emotionally damaged cats may appear to be in perfect health on the outside, although their emotions are a wreck. Emotionally abused cats are much harder to get through to, especially if they were stray cats to begin with.

Cat whisperers on the other hand, can communicate with physically and emotionally abused cats. Cats know who they will choose to be their cat whisperer, which is normally an individual they sense trust with. Cat whisperers are common with cats, although most people have never heard of them before. Even though a cat whisperer may be able to communicate better with cats, it will still take time to heal a cat that has been abused.

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Things To Know Before Breeding Your Cat

(category: Cats, Word count: 479)
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The population of cats is the United States alone is unbelievable. Nearly all experts will tell you that you should spay your cat instead of breed it. No matter what experts have to say, a lot of people want to have a litter of kittens from their cat. Before you decide to breed your cat, there are a few things that you should think about.

The first thing you should know is that breeding cats takes time. For the next two months after the litter is born, you'll need to clean the area on a daily basis. You'll also need to watch over the kittens as well, and keep a close eye on how they are developing. If you plan to breed a litter of cats, you won't have time for much of anything else.

Breeding cats will also require a good degree of space as well. If you have a small apartment, you shouldn't attempt to breed a cat. You should also make sure that your family agrees with the idea, as it isn't good for the kittens if you keep them locked up. Keep in mind that kittens like to see things; they'll end up going all over your home as well.

Breeding cats also requires a degree of responsibility as well. You should always have a plan of approach, including homes for the kittens to go that you aren't planning to keep. Keep in mind that things can change, someone who wanted a cat may change his mind once the litter is born. In this event, you must decide whether or not you can keep a kitten that doesn't have a home.

Breeding also requires some education as well. You should be prepared for any problems along the way, as well as what takes place during birth. From cutting umbilical cords to delivering early, you'll need to be well prepared. You should also have the proper supplies, and know how to handle things in the event of a c-section. You'll also need to know what to feed pregnant cats, as their diets are very important if you are breeding.

Breeding will also cost money as well, with kittens costing a lot more money than you may think. The food isn't the only thing that's expensive, as the vet bills can also get expensive. Even though you may go through the entire pregnancy without going to the vet, you'll still need de-worming and vaccination medicines as well.

In short, there is a lot to think about where breeding is concerned. If you have your mind set on it and you want to breed, you should be sure that you have the proper knowledge and everything you need before hand. You should always be ready to handle anything associated with breeding - and prepare yourself for the worst possible scenario.

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Giving Your Cat A Pill

(category: Cats, Word count: 474)
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Giving a cat a pill can be a nightmare. No cat wants something shoved down his throat, and he will fight you tooth and nail to prevent it. Although most cats are small in size, you'd be quite amazed with how much power they actually have. There are ways that you can get your cat to take his pills, which we will cover below.

The easiest way to give a cat pill is to crush the power into a powdery form by putting it between two spoons. Once the pill is powder, mix it in with some wet cat food. Cats that are used to eating dry cat food will see the wet food and think of it as a treat. They will normally eat it up, unaware that they just took their medicine.

If the medicine happens to be in capsule form, all you have to do is pry the capsule apart then sprinkle the medicine on some wet food and serve it to your pet. If the food also contains the pill or if your pet is sick, chances are he won't eat it. In this event, you should look into a pet piller. You can get these handy devices from your veterinarian. They are plastic rods that hold the pill until you press a plunger. When you get one, you should always get a long one with a softer tip.

When you get your gun, your vet should show you how to use it. The most difficult aspect of using the gun is getting your cat to open his mouth. The gun will more or less shoot the pill in the cat's mouth, and down his throat. You'll need to hold him tight, to make sure that he doesn't wiggle his way loose. Once you have his mouth open, you'll need to squeeze the trigger and pull the gun away quickly. After the pill has been inserted, make sure you give your cat a treat.

If you aren't comfortable using the gun, you can always try giving your cat his pills by hand. To do it this way, you'll need to hold your cat still, and open his mouth with your hand. Once you have his mouth open, you should aim for the back of his throat and throw the pill in. Once it is in his mouth, you should close his mouth with your hand and hold it shut for a few moments. This way, your cat will swallow the pill if he hasn't already.

If you can't get any of the above techniques to work, you can always go to a local pharmacy and get them to a make flavored gel or liquid using your cats medication. You should use this as a last resort though, as it can tend to get expensive.

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Heartworm Treatment For Cats

(category: Cats, Word count: 469)
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As most pet owners already know, heartworm treatment for cats and dogs isn't the same. Never, under any circumstances, should you give your cat heartworm treatment that is designed for a dog - or vice versa. Even though you may own both dogs and cats, you should always give them medicine that is designed for their species.

No matter how you look at it, heartworm treatment isn't easy. Your goal is to get rid of the heartworms, although there are several factors that you'll need to consider. The first thing to do is take your cat to the vet, as he will be able to run tests to determine just how many heartworms your pet has. He can also find out how the worms are affecting your cat and if your cat can deal with any side effects that the treatment medicine may impose.

Heartworms are a very serious condition, as the worms will feast on the vital areas around your cat's heart. Treatment can be serious as well, especially if something goes wrong. Veterinarians are trained to deal with heartworms though, in both cats and dogs. Even though you may be able to buy treatment medicine at your local department store, you should always consult with your vet before you give anything to your pet.

Treating your cat for heartworms may indeed be no treatment at all, as cats are extremely difficult to treat. The dying worms have side effects as well, often times causing more than 1/3 of the treated cats to end up with serious problems. Dying worms can become lodged in the arteries of the heart, which are already inflamed due to the worms being there. When a lodged worm starts to decompose, it can lead to very serious problems. Pets that have a serious infestation with heartworms may need to spend some time at the hospital, to ensure that they are properly treated.

Some cats may not be able to take a certain type of heartworm treatment medicine. Depending on the side affects and how the medicine affects the cat, some breeds may not be able to take some of the better medicines. To determine the best treatment options for your cat, your vet will need to run several tests. Once the tests have concluded, your vet will be able to tell you the best options available for treatment.

With all diseases, prevention is a lot better and safer than treatment. Be sure to talk to your vet and find out what heartworm prevention medication is the best to use. Your vet can tell you what you need to get, and how to use it. This way, you can prevent your pet from getting heartworms - and the serious side effects and life threatening issues that go along with them.

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Caring For Persian Cats

(category: Cats, Word count: 597)
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These days, Persian cats are among the most popular breeds of cat. Well known for their gentle and sweet personalities and their long hair, Persian cats have very attractive features. They are great companions for virtually anyone, and not very demanding. Unlike other breeds, such as the Siamese breed, Persian breeds need very little attention.

Although white is the color normally associated with Persian cats, they actually come in a variety of other colors as well. During competitions, they are divided into seven color divisions - solid, silver and gold, tabby, shaded and smoke, particolor, bicolor, and Himalayan. No matter what color of Persian cat it may be, they are best noticed during competitions by their long and flowing coats.

Persian cats should always be kept inside of the house, to protect their coat. If they travel outside, they can easily damage their coat. They will also need to be brushed daily with a metal comb, or their coat can become tangled, which will lead to hairballs. You'll need to bathe your Persian cat on a regular basis as well, to help protect his coat. Bathing works best when the cat is young, as it will get him used to it. Bathing should never be overlooked, as it will keep your cats coat looking clean and healthy. Although some breeds can maintain their coats on their own, Persians can't. Their fur is long and dense and you'll need to groom them daily to ensure their coat stays healthy.

The Persian breed is gentle and sweet, getting along great with everyone - including kids. They have a pleasant voice that is always good to hear. Using their voice and their eyes, they can communicate very well with their owners. They are very playful, yet they don't require a lot of attention. They love attention however, and love being admired. Unlike other cats, they don't climb and jump much at all. They aren't destructive either; they just love being admired and lying around. A majority of the time, Persian cats love to bask in the sun and show others just how beautiful they truly are.

Although most breeds can be kept indoors or outside, Persian cats should always be kept inside and never allowed to go outside of the house. Keeping them inside with protect their coats and also keep diseases and common parasites away from them as well. You won't have to worry about cars or dogs either if you keep your pet inside.

To ensure that your Persian pet stays healthy, you should always take him to the vet on an annual basis. If cared for properly, such as grooming, shots, and checkups, Persian cats can live as long as 20 years. One thing you'll need to be aware of that's common with Persians is their eyes. Their eyes are very big and can sometimes be too much for the cat to clean. This is a common healthy problem with the breed, and should be checked on a regular basis to ensure that it doesn't get out of control.

When you compare Persians to other breeds, you'll notice that the Persians are among the easiest to keep. You don't have to worry about things like jumping or climbing, as Persians don't like to do either. All you'll need to do is feed your cat and groom him or him on a daily basis. Even though grooming can be quite a bit of work in the long run - it's well worth it when you have a healthy an beautiful Persian cat.

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Taking Care Of Cats

(category: Cats, Word count: 628)
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These days, cats are among the most popular pet you can own. There are several breeds available, with the most popular being Persian and Siamese. Cats are a domesticated animal, with origins dating back some 8,000 years and beyond. Like any other pet that you may own, including dogs, cats cost money to take care of properly.

When you get a cat, you'll need to think about the costs. You'll obviously need food, and you'll also need to plan ahead for vet costs. You'll also need litter, which can tend to get quite expensive as the years go by. Your cat will need a litter box, food dish, and water dish. You should also invest in some toys as well, such as a scratching post, cat toys, a pet carrier, and a bed. You should also look into getting an ID collar as well, just in case your cat ever gets lost.

Feeding your pet will depend a great deal on his age. Older cats require two small meals or one large meal for the day. Kittens on the other hand, require several feedings a day until they get around the age of 12 weeks. Cats that are between three and six months of age need to be fed three times a day. Canned food can be fed to cats, although any food that has been left out longer than 30 minutes need to be disposed of. Canned food can get expensive fast, and you should always keep in mind that some may need to be thrown away when you buy it. Cats loved canned food, although it doesn't have any benefits to their dental health like dry food does.

As an alternative plan, you can always leave a supply of dry food out for your pet. When you give your cat dry food, you should always make sure that he has enough water. Dry food costs less than canned food, and it can also help to prevent the buildup of tartar on your cat's teeth. When you buy dry food, you should always look in terms of health and benefits, and stay away from generic food. Even though generic food may be cheaper, it may not offer the nutrients your pet needs.

If you own a kitten, you should only give you kitten food designed for him. You'll also need to clean and refill his water dish every day. Even though kittens and adult cats like cow's milk, you should avoid giving it to them as it can cause diarrhea. Treats are fine on occasion, although too many of them can cause your pet to get fat. Feeding your kitten human food is good on occasion, although you may have to mix it in with his cat food.

By themselves, cats stay fairly clean. Although you don't have to bathe them that often, you'll need to give them a brushing at least once a day. Brushing will reduce the risk of hairballs and keep your cat's coat nice and clean. If you are keeping your cat indoors, you'll need to have a litter box in an area that is easy for your cat to access. You should always scoop it on a daily basis, and clean it out once a week. Cats don't like to use dirty litter boxes, they prefer for it to be nice and clean.

Although cats do require some work, they are great pets that will provide you with years and years of companionship. As long as you take care of your cat and take him to the vet for his checkups, he should remain healthy. Even though cats can get sick from time to time - knowing how to care for him will make a world of difference.

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