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What Is Surround Sound And Why Do You Want It

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 398)
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Whether you are an audio novice or an experienced technophile, this article is for you. Let's take a few minutes to review the basics of surround sound, and the principles behind it. If you are new to surround sound, this will help you to understand the concept. It will also refresh the memory of those already in the know. These are the basics of sound.

Monophonic sound is single channel and unidirectional. Basically, this means that your audio is all filtered down into a flat single channel. All elements of the recording are mixed down into one source, thereby seeming to originate from the same source no matter where you are standing in the room. This is old school, kids.

Stereophonic sound is reproduced through two channels and is considered superior to monophonic sound. You can tell stereophonic sound, because different sounds originate from either speaker. This type of sound gives one the sense of being there during the recording. The best example of this is listening to a recording of the symphony, where different band members are located in different parts of the room. The strings are over here, and the horns are over there.

Surround sound was first pioneered by Dolby in the early 1970's, and first used in movies such as "Tommy" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind". The Dolby process encapsulates four channels of audio; left, right, rear, and phantom center. The reason it is called phantom center is because it is essentially a mix of the left and right front channels. This gives the listener the impression of being surrounded by sound, hence the name surround sound.

Dolby surround sound has evolved considerably in recent years. Dolby 5.1 is bar far the most common. Dolby 5.1 is similar to traditional surround sound, but it is further broken down and processed into more distinct channels. Dolby 5.1 increases the range of sound by adding stereo rear sound as well as a dedicated subwoofer channel. This results in a far superior surround sound experience. You not only hear surround sound, but you feel it, too!

Technology is ever changing, and the marketplace offers many surround sound options. This article is not complete by any means, and only serves as a primer on the basics. Check out your local electronics superstore for the latest technology.

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Windows Vista Ultimate Review

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 3033)
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Windows Vista is Microsoft's first new operating system in more than five years and the successor to Windows XP. However, it is not worth rushing out to purchase. If you desperately need to buy a new PC (if your old one died or you've been waiting and waiting for Vista to be released), then by all means do so; there's nothing wrong with Windows Vista. But there's no one compelling feature within Windows Vista that cries out to switch over, neither the enhanced graphic capabilities (Aero) nor the improved system performance features (truthfully, our Windows XP doesn't crash). As for security, Microsoft's biggest improvements in Windows Vista are within the Enterprise or 64-bit editions, editions most home users will not be running. Windows Vista is not the Apple Mac OS X 10.4 killer one hoped for (or feared). Nor are there specific big-name software packages written exclusively for Windows Vista-most software available today is compatible with both Windows XP and Windows Vista. But the extensive tie-ins to Microsoft.com and Live.com, and the many, many interdependences upon Internet Explorer 7 left us desperately wanting more (and often best-of-breed) alternatives. Hard core Microsofties who live and breathe within the MSN, Live.com, and Microsoft desktop software ecosystem will rejoice with the release of Windows Vista, but for the rest of us who are product agnostic, who use Firefox, Google Desktop, ZoneAlarm, GMail, and Corel WordPerfect, Windows XP SP2 will suffice nicely until some killer program necessitates that we all upgrade to Windows Vista.

There are six major editions of Windows Vista; we're reviewing four. We chose not to review Windows Vista Enterprise (available only to volume license customers) and Windows Vista Starter (available only outside the United States). Windows Vista Ultimate includes everything, and this is the edition getting the most promotion from Microsoft. It is not the edition most people will find packaged on their shiny new PCs or will end up with after an upgrade of existing hardware. See our feature comparison chart to know which edition is right for your specific needs, and check the following individual reviews for more details:

Windows Vista Business

Windows Vista Home Premium

Windows Vista Home Basic

Setup and installation

The Windows Vista DVD disc includes a Windows Imaging (WIM) format of the code, so whether you buy the Home Basic edition or the Ultimate edition, the code remains the same; only the product key unlocks your specific set of features. This means users who opt for the lesser editions can always upgrade (assuming they have the proper hardware) by downloading some additional code and securing a new product key online. However, all features-even if you paid for them-are dependent on specific hardware configurations being present; if you don't have the proper graphics hardware, for example, you'll simply never see the Aero graphic effects on that old Dell computer in your basement.

Hardware requirements for Windows Vista should not be taken lightly. In a controversial move to garner positive reviews, Microsoft sent hundreds of bloggers (not including CNET) free copies of Windows Vista Ultimate; Microsoft did not send boxed copies, rather the software giant sent top-of-the-line Acer Ferrari laptops with the operating system preinstalled. So even Microsoft seems to admit that the best performance is only available on top-of-the-line machines manufactured within the last year or so.

That said, many people will still want to upgrade their current Windows XP SP2. This will keep all your current data and applications, importing them directly into the new operating system. To see which edition(s) of Windows Vista your current computer can handle, visit the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor to find specific hardware recommendations so you don't buy the wrong edition. Most people will find either Windows Vista Home Basic or Windows Vista Home Premium to be their best choice. While Windows Vista does make a backup of your previous operating system before installing, it is always recommended that you backup your current Windows XP system yourself, just in case.

Rather than upgrade, we recommend you perform a clean installation. With a clean installation, you keep all your current on the Windows XP drive and install only the data and applications you want to run on Windows Vista. A clean install can be accomplished by buying a new PC with Windows Vista already installed, partitioning an existing Windows XP machine to dual-boot into Windows Vista, or adding a new hard drive to an existing Windows XP machine.

Our clean installations took anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, depending on the hardware in the system. It's pretty much an automated process, with the installer first copying the WIM image onto the new hard drive or partition then expanding that image. Once again, we experienced an uncomfortably long plateau at "Expanding: 27 percent"; as with previous builds, we waited between two and five minutes before the expansion continued. About halfway through, the installer reboots and continues the installation in Windows Vista.

During the installation, Windows Vista will load the drivers included within the installation image, but it will also download additional drivers from a much larger database at Microsoft. This assumes, however, that one has an always-on Internet connection; dial-up users may find that upon completion of the installation process some drivers are missing.

Once fully installed, Windows Vista first asks for your country or region, then time and currency, and, finally, the desired keyboard layout. Next, you'll choose a username, a user icon, and a password. Then select your desktop wallpaper and security settings: Automatic, Install Important Updates Only, or Ask Me Later. After reviewing the computer's time and date settings, there's one more message: "Please wait while Windows checks your computer's performance." Here, Microsoft grades your computer on a five-point scale, with the overall rating based on your system's lowest score (in our case, that was for the video card).

Windows Vista includes new musical tones written by veteran musician Robert Fripp. Compared to the familiar start-up tones of Windows XP, Windows Vista's are lighter, almost spritely. The sounds for User Account Control and Log Off are also perkier than those found in similar security warnings within Windows XP.

New on the Windows Vista desktop is a Welcome Center which contains links to frequently asked questions such as, "How do you configure your printer?" and "How do you connect to your Internet service?" There is also room for some sales opportunities, either with manufacturer specials or online offers from Microsoft, such as the Windows Live OneCare service. Frankly, we think it is better for you to look beyond the Windows ecosystem for e-mail, Internet browsers, and security applications.

After closing the Welcome Center, you'll notice to the far right there is a shaded sidebar populated with three example Gadgets ("widgets" to everyone else), tiny desktop applets that display content, such as RSS feeds. In one Gadget, a slide show of images from the sample photo library display; in the next, the current time; finally, there's a Gadget for subscribed RSS feeds. We downloaded and installed Firefox 2, made Firefox our default browser, and quickly set up a few RSS feed subscriptions. Guess what? The Windows Vista Gadget was unresponsive to our efforts, displaying only the default MSN feeds from Microsoft. Microsoft says the default RSS Gadget feeds off a common store of RSS feeds within Windows Vista, and firefox hasn't yet adopted the API for that store. You have to use Internet Explorer 7 or choose a Firefox-friendly Gadget instead. By clicking the + symbol atop the sidebar, you'll see a panel of available Gadgets, with a link out to the Web to find even more. The Gadgets are not fixed to the sidebar; they can be dragged across the desktop. And even the sidebar itself can be disabled to allow for a full desktop view. An icon located within the taskbar will restore the sidebar at any time.

The familiar Start menu features some cosmetic changes for Windows Vista. Aside from the distinctive rounded icon, the Start menu now includes a built-in Search function. We would have preferred to have access to Search directly from the desktop rather than digging down a level or two. The All Programs list now displays as an expandable/collapsible directory tree, something Windows should have offered years ago. The new Start menu is divided in half, with access to documents, pictures, music, games, recent items, My Computer, network, Control Panel, default programs, and Help along the right-hand side.

Also new within Start is an Instant Off button. This button caches all your open files and processes, allowing you to turn off your laptop or desktop quickly without all the "cleaning up files" messages you see in previous versions. We like the feature, but on our Acer Travelmate 8200, Instant Off and closing the lid to hibernate sometimes produced limbo states where the laptop simply wouldn't wake up again, forcing us to reboot.

In Windows Vista, files become unmoored from the traditional directory tree structure-kind of. The more ambitious plan of including a whole new file system was scrapped early on; instead, Windows Vista relies on metatags, which are keywords linked to files to make them searchable. With metatags, you can create virtual file folders based on a variety of search terms. Say you're doing a report on mountains, any file that is keyword-enabled to include "mountains" will be grouped into a virtual folder without physically dragging that file to a new location. The downside is that older files (say you upgraded your system from Windows XP or imported data from an earlier version of Windows) will have to be retroactively metataged in order to be searched. Also different is the file path displayed within Windows Explorer. Gone are the backslashes, replaced with arrows that offer drop-down menus of alternative folders. We liked this efficient feature.

Finally, there's a compatibility wizard buried deep within Windows Vista. Most Windows XP applications we loaded performed just fine. Operating under the hood, Windows Vista convinces native Windows XP applications that they're running on Windows XP. Should you need to run an older application, say from Windows 95, the compatibility wizard allows you to tweak the display resolution and emulate Windows 95 for that program. For example, we were able to run a Windows 95-optimized game demo on our Windows Vista test system.

Features

There are too many individual features within Windows Vista Ultimate Edition to call out-seriously. However, our gut feeling is that most of the significant bells and whistles are designed for the Enterprise-level customers, not the home user. Having a large number of features should not be confused with actually providing significant value to all users across the board. We would have preferred fewer features executed extremely well rather than an uneven mix of this and that, a one-size-fits-all operating system. And we disagree with Microsoft's seemingly arbitrary division of features within individual editions.

Common to all editions of Windows Vista are ad hoc backup and recovery, instant Search, Internet Explorer 7 browser, Windows Media Player 11, Windows Mail e-mail client, Windows Calendar, Windows Photo Gallery, performance tuning and self-diagnostics, Internet protocol IPv6 and IPv4 support, Windows ReadyDrive, a maximum of 4GB RAM support on 32-bit editions (up to 128GB RAM on some 64-bit editions), Windows Sync Center for mobile devices, Windows Mobility Center for presentations on the road, User Account Control security protection, Windows Security Center, Windows Defender antispyware, Windows Firewall, Windows Meeting Space for ad hoc wireless meetings, Remote Desktop for working from home, XPS document support for PDF-like files, improved peer-to-peer networking, improved VPN support, and improved power management. Included within certain editions (and thus also included within the Ultimate edition) are Windows Media Center, Windows Tablet PC, Windows Movie Maker, Windows DVD Maker, Parental Controls, Windows SideShow for remote gadgets, domain join for Windows Small Business Server, Group Policy support, Client-side file caching, Roaming User Profiles for remote server access, Windows Fax and Scan, Windows ShadowCopy to create file backups, Windows Rights Management Services to protect documents, Windows BitLocker hard drive encryption, integrated smart card management, and various Windows Ultimate Extras to be named later. Despite many feature changes within Windows Vista, Microsoft has held onto its original marketing promise of providing users with Clear, Confident, and Connected solutions.

For Clear, Microsoft cites its new Aero graphics. Aero is part of the Windows Presentation Foundation, a subgroup of the .Net Foundation Framework, an underlying foundation for developers to build new applications. One applet is the New York Times Times Reader, the first of many products written exclusively for Windows Vista but hardly a compelling reason by itself to upgrade. Though video playback and, yes, even the tiny icons on Windows Vista are now crisp and colorful with Aero, unless you watch YouTube videos all day, you won't really need Aero, nor will you miss the tiny preview windows enabled on your desktop display. Also new is Microsoft's Adobe PDF-like file format called XPS (Extensible Page System); however, any Windows XP SP2 machine can view XPS-created pages with downloads of the .Net 3 Framework Foundation and the Internet Explorer 7 browser.

For Confident, Microsoft touts new security enhancements within Windows Vista. You shouldn't encounter User Account Control (UAC) except when changing system configurations or installing new software, and even then, wouldn't you-in this age of downloadable spyware-prefer to know when an executable file is about to run? While UAC notifies you of pending system changes, it doesn't always require a password. Microsoft's more controversial method to lock down the system kernel, PatchGuard, is only available in the 64-bit editions of Windows Vista; most home users will not run these editions. Another celebrated security feature works only within Windows Mail, which most people are unlikely to use. And finally, the jury is still out on whether Internet Explorer 7 is more secure than, say, Firefox 2. Windows Vista also includes a built-in but limited two-way firewall and free Windows Defender antispyware, which ranked poor in competitive testing done by Download.com.

For Connected, Microsoft points to the new peer-to-peer possibilities, some of which are the result of its acquisition of Groove several years ago. From within Windows Explorer (which displays different toolbar options for exploring documents, photos, or music) you can move any file into a Public Folder and then mark the file or folder for sharing on a network. Within the Business and Ultimate editions you can further mark individual files for remote access.

Performance

Upon installation, Windows Vista rates each system's overall hardware performance, with the final score reflecting your system's lowest individual score. This is handy. For example, if you suspect that everything's running a little slow, you might find that your hard drive is returning the lowest score. Windows Vista will then recommend a faster hard drive or a drive with larger compatibility. Mostly, though, the video card will be the sore spot for most users. There's also an event log viewer to show, for example, after a specific software install your system performance started to degrade, and that uninstalling the software may restore your overall performance.

Under the hood, Microsoft has moved device drivers for DVD burners and printers out of the system kernel; Microsoft says that a majority of system crashes can be traced to improperly installed third-party device drivers. Thus Windows Vista hopes to vanquish the dreaded Blue Screen of Death common to earlier releases of Windows. Indeed, after testing several early builds, we found Windows Vista to be remarkably stable and robust.

Support

Along with the performance monitors, Microsoft has improved the Help section considerably. There is a static FAQ, but it also links to Microsoft online and allows outreach to other users for help, either via a forum or direct PC-to-PC help. Of these, we really like a feature available on some, not all, FAQs that allows you to automate the solution by executing a script. This method doesn't teach you how to do it in the future, but it will accomplish the task at hand. For example, if you choose to update a device driver, Windows Vista will darken the desktop; highlight and open the Start menu, the Control Panel, and the Device Manager; then pause to ask you what device you want to update. It's like having a technician at your desktop, walking you though the process. There's an increasing reliance on user-generated support forums, which leads us to believe that Microsoft is shying away from its own live technical support. At press time, Microsoft's final support policy was unavailable.

Perhaps we're spoiled, but after more than five years of development, there's a definite "Is that all?" feeling about Windows Vista. Like cramming an info-dump into a book report the night before it's due, there certainly are a lot of individual features within the operating system, but the real value lies in their execution-how the user experiences (or doesn't experience) these-and like the info-dump, we came away shaking our heads, disappointed. Compared with Mac OS X 10.4, Windows Vista feels clunky and not very intuitive, almost as though it's still based on DOS (or at least the internal logic that made up DOS). Despite the addition of a system-wide, built-in Search, and various efforts to break away from staidly old directory trees, you still need to drill down one level to even access Search. And there are far too many dependencies on Microsoft products; this is not a very objective operating system, as preference is always given to Microsoft products (of which there are many), from MSN Search to RSS feeds only from Internet Explorer. But is Windows Vista a bad operating system? No. It's just a disappointment for PC users who hoped that Microsoft would deliver something truly exciting to finally leapfrog ahead of Apple. They failed. But stick around; this is just Windows Vista 1.0. Windows Vista Service Pack 1 is due out sometime before the end of the year. Windows Vista SP1 promises to fix what's known to be wrong within Windows Vista and should offer a few concrete reasons to switch.

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How To Add A Usb 2 0 Hub To Your Computer

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 657)
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Digital and video Cameras, scanners, mp3 players, and just about every other electronic device are designed to be connected to your computer.

And all new computers make it simple to connect these devices with the use of the USB or Universal Serial Bus port. But with the many devices you may have,you can still run short of these ports.

If you find your computer using all of its USB ports, you can get your hands on a USB Hub. This hub contains several usb ports. So rather than unplugging one device to plug in another, a usb hub allows you to connect multiple devices.

To setup a usb hub on your computer you need to be sure your system allow you to connect the hub. If your computer was made before 1997 it most likely won't support a USB.

Check your computer to see if there is a usb port available. http://www.ultimatepcrepair.com/photos.html have photos showing what USB ports look like and where they should be found in any computer.

You should consider the reason you want to purchase a USB hub. This will help in deciding the type of usb hub you want to purchase. And research the device you want to connect, as not all devices can be connected to USB hubs.

The two types of USB hubs are the Self Powered which draws power from an external power supply and the bus powered hub which is inserted in an expansion slot and draws power from the motherboard.

Some devices that use large amounts of power work poorly with bus powered hubs. A scanner for example, will wotk much better connected to a self powered USB hub.

When connecting a device to the USB hub, see what version of usb it may be. USB 1.0 was the first version released and today the fast version is the usb 2.0 All USB 2.0 hubs are backward compatible. This allows them to run the slower USB 1.0 devices.

The price of a hub 2.0 hub varies from about $25.00 to $65.00 and comes in several brands. The price depends on the number of ports you want on the hub.

INSTALLING YOUR NEW USB HUB

Its always a good practice to backup your files before you work in your computer.Remove the hub from its packing and carefully inspect it for damaged and be sure all components are present. Stop and carefully read the hub manual for instructions such as turn the computer off first or that you must install the software before connecting the hub to the computer.

If you have a powered hub, plug the power cord in an outlet and connect the usb cable from the usb hub into an open USB port. With the hub connected place the cdrom that come with the hub and install the software onto the hard drive.

Set the USB hub in a location where you can easily connect your scanner,modem,or other devices. Remember that your computer only runs at the highest usb speed.If your hub is a USB 2.0 but your computer only supports USB 1.0 then the 1.0 connection will be your max speed.

If your USB hub is self powered,install the card in an empty expansion slot by removing the system unit cover, removing the retaining screw and cover from the slot, firmly slide the card in the slot, and use the retaining screw to secure it to the motherboard.

Start your computer and your operating system should recognize the new device. Install any software that came with the hub.You may need to install a device driver to allow the computer to communicate with the hub.

Its that easy and why not make it something fun to do. Learn as you go and be in the state of mind to enjoy your task. You will look forward to perform other tasks in the same state of mind.

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Information Technology Degrees

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 786)
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The field of Information Technology encompasses several specific disciplines, including Web Development, Network Administration, and Database Administration. Information Technology has become a necessary department in most businesses today due to the prevalence of the Internet and computer-based networks providing the basis of all database storage and communications in organizations. Information Technology is a highly competitive field, and the best way to be competitive and realize your career potential is to get an Information Technology degree. And doing so through an online Information Technology degree program is a convenient and cutting edge way to gain the tools you need in this fast-paced field.

Information Technology professionals have become one of the biggest assets to any organization that relies on computer networks. IT professionals are troubleshooters when systems go down; they are lifesavers when files get lost. Information Technology is a hands-on profession that requires skill and training. Having an Information Technology degree will show an organization that you have the tools to help keep their networking machine running smoothly. And if you already have an IT degree, continuing your education is a great way to keep up with new technologies, and achieve your greatest career aspirations.

There are many advantages to earning an Information Technology degree online. Proximity is not a factor in choosing the right college or University for you. Attending classes and submitting coursework online eliminates the need for commuting or relocating, so you can keep working while you attend school. Convenience is another factor in earning a college degree online. A college may be able to offer many convenient sections of certain courses, allowing you more choices as to when to attend classes. Night and weekend sections of courses are usually offered as well, which is ideal for you if you work full time and/or care for a family. Further, if you are considering returning to school after several years, seeking your Information Technology degree online is a great way to ease into the routine of class work and projects again, and can reduce the pressure of feeling the need to fit in with younger students. In addition, who wouldn't find it appealing to attend college from the comforts of home?

Whether you are seeking a degree (Associate's, Bachelor's, or a graduate degree) or if you are seeking certification in specific skill areas, there are several options if you are considering receiving your Information Technology degree online. There are several online-only institutions that are fully accredited and offer many degree and certification programs. Accreditation is an important factor to consider in choosing an online college. If you have previous college credits you would like to transfer, attending an accredited college will be necessary to do that. Also, accreditation is beneficial for having your degree recognized by employers and professional organizations. Online-only colleges offer the benefit of a cutting edge learning format technologically in addition to the same quality education that campus-based degree programs offer, as well as accelerated programs for those who are in a hurry to earn a college degree for professional advancement. And more and more, traditional colleges and Universities are adding online distance learning programs to their curricula, so your options are virtually endless.

If you are worried that you might not be able to afford getting your Information Technology degree online, you have options. Some employers might offer to pay a portion or even all tuition and fees toward an employee receiving a degree. Also, financial aid in the form of grants, loans, and even scholarships might be available to you. Check with the particular online program of interest to see what financial options are available, since some colleges might not offer financial aid to students who attend part-time.

You might be concerned that earning your Information Technology degree through an online program won't provide as enriching an experience as attending a traditional campus-based college or University. Earning an Information Technology degree online can be an experience that is every bit as enriching, interpersonal, and dynamic as attending college the old-fashioned way. A big misconception is that online learning is impersonal. This isn't the case at all. Programs offered online present the same opportunities for group work, independent study, and interpersonal communication as do traditional methods of learning. You also still receive the same detail-oriented training as you would attending a face-to-face program. In fact, attending college online helps to facilitate the independent learning process, as well as developing time management skills. Attending college online takes just as much commitment as the old-fashioned way of going to school. Going online to earn your Information Technology degree is a legitimate, convenient, and flexible way for you to advance your education, as well as your career and personal potential.

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Guide To Buying A Desktop Computer

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 386)
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With the rapid pace of technological developments, nothing has become as ubiquitous as the computer. Everyone's got one. And they are used for all manner of endeavour, by people of all walks of life. So, do you simply buy the computer that someone's selling? Or do you do some homework and figure out what detailed specifications are going to make some difference to you?

At Myshopping.com.au you can compare the prices of a wide range of different computers from different vendors and of different specifications. This guide will help you find what you're looking for.

Mac or Windows (PC)

At the outset, you need to decide what you are going to use the computer for. This will help you make the fundamental decision of whether you should go Mac or PC. Although, with the advent of the dual core processor (an Intel chip now used by Mac) the differences are narrowed a little, there are still some choices that can help you favour one system over another. Historically, Mac computers have a reputation for greater stability that comes from a more robust operating system than Windows based computers. Largely for this reason, Macs have been the computer of choice for the graphic design industry, the music production industry and the video production industry. This has prompted the software manufacturers to make professional software packages for these disciplines that favour the Mac operating system. Although they have packages supporting the Windows operating system, they are often less capable.

Consequently, if you are engaged in these industries and need your computer for this type of work, you should consider Mac. Mac computers appear to attract fewer viruses and software malfunctions than do Windows based PCs. On the down side, there has always appeared to have been limited software support for Mac systems.

Another decision that may guide your choice is the aesthetics of the computer. If you have limited available space, there is nothing quite like the iMacs or the mini Macs for space saving. iMac's all-in-one desktop units are compact and complete with all the connectivity you need. However, the look of other brands may be more to your taste, with many models available in compact packages and modern colour schemes to suit practically all d

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Backgrounds Or Layouts All Available On Myspace Layouts

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 485)
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It has become a trend to see companies and individuals coming up with something new and unique to make themselves get noticed. For companies, they need to keep working on their marketing strategies to outdo their competitors; else they will be left behind. This holds true in our daily lives as well, we need to have some extra talent or skills to succeed in this world. Since today, most of us are comfortable being online and spending time getting to know strangers, some of whom end up becoming good friends too. For this purpose, we sign up on various online communities, and networking sites which give us the freedom to express and meet people from other walks of life. Once we enter the world of online forums, we strive to stay afloat by coming up with interesting messages. If we can't, then we can fall back on MySpace Layouts to help us out. By using one of the MySpace Layouts, we can jazz up our page and change the whole look. This will get people curious about how we managed to spruce it up like this and start a connection.

Initially, once you have signed up on a site, you will notice your page has a default MySpace Layouts which is barren, white background with dark grey or black fonts wherever there are words. After spending a bit of time on the site, you will realize there are ways by which you can add colors, or images or maybe a video too. There are various sections on the MySpace Layouts that you can add to your page. For this, you need to go to one of the sites that have a good collection of MySpace Layouts and choose the ones you like.

Here is what you can do to tweak your page using MySpace Layouts

Background or layout -

Are you interested in only using MySpace Layouts for putting up a background picture or change the whole feel of the page? Backgrounds are just images that will appear on the page, and the font color or other buttons will remain as they are. These are also available on MySpace Layouts site, again divided into various categories.

Layouts on the other hand are themes, which have been created by other individuals like yourself or professionals. It consists of HTML codes, and you can alter it to suit your tastes. For those who are not familiar with html codes, they need not worry for MySpace Layouts has pre-made layouts with their own html codes. All you need to do is zero in on your choice, copy the code and put it in your "About me "element or in main page box. If you have any text already typed on in your page, and then paste this code below it all, else your text could get messed up.

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Adobe Graphic Design Website Software Lets Your Creativity Flow

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Whether you're a web developer, a graphic designer, or an artist, you've undoubtedly counted on Adobe software to help you get the job done. Now, the design world is buzzing about Adobe Creative Suite 3, a collection of computer graphic design tools that are fully integrated to allow you to work in almost any medium.

Adobe offers six different editions of CS3, designed to fit the needs of a variety of professionals. The six editions are:

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Design Premium - Developed for the designer who works in mobile, Web, and print publishing, CS3 Design Premium includes the professional or extended versions of InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, Dreamweaver, and Acrobat.

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Design Standard - Perfect for the professional who works primarily in print, CS3 Design Premium includes InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Acrobat Professional.

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Web Premium - Adobe takes web design software to a whole new level by allowing integration across virtually all Adobe products, including Photoshop Extended, Illustrator, Flash Professional, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Contribute Cue, Bridge, and Device Central.

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Web Standard - Perfect for website design, this graphics software integrates Dreamweaver, Flash Professional, Fireworks, and Contribute.

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Production Platinum - Adobe solves the challenges of video post production by combining a wide variety of products, including Bridge, Dynamic Link, Device Central, Acrobat Connect, After Effects, Premiere Pro, Photoshop Extended, Flash Professional, Illustrator, Soundbooth, and Encore. For professionals working in a Windows environment, it also includes OnLocation and Ultra.

Adobe Creative Suite 3 Master Collection - The CS3 Master Collection is a computer graphics dream come true, with virtually every Adobe product integrated so that you can create in almost any medium, including film, print, mobile, Web, and interactive. The Master Collection includes InDesign, Photoshop Extended, Illustrator, Acrobat Professional, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Contribute, After Effects, Premiere Pro, Soundbooth, and Encore. Web applications include Bridge, Cue, Device Central, Stock Photos, Acrobat Connect, Dynamic Link, OnLocation, and Ultra.

Essentially, CS3 provides professionals with product configurations that will enable them to seamlessly accomplish their goals. For example, designers can do web page design, user interface design, game development, e-learning, animation, and mobile development. Those who work with video can do editing and production, multimedia, audio editing and production, and visual effects. And, of course, professionals can edit and fuse images, as well as design for print.

Professionals also appreciate Adobe graphic design website software because it works on a variety of platforms, including Windows Vista and both Tiger and Leopard on Macs. And, for those who already own Adobe products, it's easy to upgrade to CS3 - even from standalone graphics software programs. Finally, those who purchase one CS3 edition and then decide that they would like an enhanced version (moving from, for example, CS3 Design Standard to Design Premium) can easily make the switch.

There's no question that the creativity of designers has spurred Adobe to step up and develop a toolkit that enables professionals to reach new heights.

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Home Internet Options The War Between Dsl And Cable

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 332)
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If you are still using dial-up, you have probably gotten either the "You don't use DSL yet?" or the "You don't use cable yet?" expressions of credulity. So you've decided that it's probably time to get off of dial-up - yet, the question remains: which is better, DSL or cable? There are advertisements arguing the perks of both, but which will really get you more bang for your buck?

The three issues to take into account when comparing DSL and cable Internet connection are speed, customer satisfaction and security.

Theoretically, cable modems run faster than DSL because they offer more bandwith. There is also a form of DSL called VDSL which can match the speed of a cable modem. However, the speed of cable is relative to the number of people in your area who are accessing the neighborhood at the same time. One popular commercial compares cable modems to drinking out of a straw - the straw is fine, if one person is drinking from it. But if the straw must be shared - well, obviously things slow down a little. Both DSL and cable also vary in speed by the minute depending on the congestion caused by multiple users.

Customer service surveys conducted by J.D. Power and Associates in 2004 showed that DSL had an edge over cable in customer satisfaction ratings. This survey looked at billing, the provider's business image, cost and tech support, and email services. Earthlink and Verizon, both DSL, were the top two service providers rated in the survey.

Since cable modems necessitate the sharing of a cable line to provide service to the entire neighborhood, DSL is slightly more secure. However, cable modems are easier to install, and many sources believe that the difference in security is not significant enough to go through the trouble of installing DSL. Many cable customers avoid security problems by putting up firewalls in order to protect themselves, and their information.

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An Introduction To Barcode Equipment

(category: Computers-Technology, Word count: 504)
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A complete barcode system will consist of software, scanners, a printer or labeler and labels for thermo transfer or thermo direct printing. Also of interest are mobile terminals for mobile data acquisition with a built-in scanner or reader, a display and a keyboard. A POS (point of sale) solution will require laser barcode scanners with high throughput and automatic triggering for hands-free barcode scanning.

Barcode Software

Barcodes are created with special software. While barcode software for Microsoft Windows is available, best suited for barcode creation are Apple Macintosh computers. Macs are preferable due to their strong position in the DTP, prepress and graphics market segment. A typical barcode software will support the common symbologies, calculate checksums automatically and will provide a variety of output options with support for the most common images formats (like PNG, TIFF or JPG) and also for Post Script or EPS.

A cheap alternative to dedicated barcode generators are so called barcode fonts. However, the quality a barcode created with such a font will usually not conform to the respective standards.

Depending on the application the use of dedicated, barcode enabled, label printing software may be advised. For example, such software can be used to print sequential barcodes (for serial numbers) or print logos or product images next to the actual barcode.

Barcode Scanner

Barcode Scanners, also known as barcode readers exist in various forms: The most common type are laser scanners. Here a moving laser beam scans the code which results in fast and error free reading. A cheap alternative to laser scanners are CCD scanners that feature a row of light emitting diodes and photo detectors. The earliest type of barcode reader where so called barcode wands, also known a magic wands. Here a single light emitting diode (LED) and a single photo detector are used to detect the typical black and white pattern of a barcode. While laser and CCD barcode scanners scan a barcode as a whole the barcode wand has to be swiped across the code to read it.

Barcode Printers

Barcode printers are used to print the barcode on self adhesive labels. Today most barcode label printers work in either thermo direct or thermo transfer mode. Using the thermo direct principle the print head applies heat to selected parts of the label which then turn dark. This is the same principle as is used with older fax machines. Thermo direct labels are sensitive to light and should not be used if they have to last longer than a few days or weeks. Typical applications are address labels which only have to last a few days.

With thermo transfer printers a heat sensitive ribbon (thermo transfer ribbon) sits between the print head and the label. As heat is applied to the ribbon, ink transfers (hence the name) from the ribbon to the label. Labels that were printed with thermo transfer are very durable. However, besides the actual label the transfer ribbon is another consumable which will increase the printing cost.

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