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Read Widely And Become Better At Homeschooling

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 527)
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For many people, homeschooling is a desirable alternative to the education offered by the public and private school systems. When you homeschool your children you have the flexibility to create an educational curriculum more suited to their needs. Homeschooling also makes economic sense, especially when you consider the costs involved with sending multiple children to a private school. If you've made the decision to homeschool your children, the first step in establishing a viable curriculum is to read widely.

To begin with, you have to ensure that you educate yourself on a wide variety of topics. While it may be tempting to focus exclusively on books teaching you how to homeschool your children, you shouldn't rely on these too heavily. Keep in mind that pedagogical method is only as important as your knowledge of a subject, and focusing your reading entirely on how to homeschool your children will leave you lacking in the practical knowledge necessary to execute it.

At first, the reading required in order to homeschool your children may seem daunting - after all, a teacher is only required to be knowledgeable on the subjects they teach, but you're going to be teaching all of the subjects. Keep in mind, however, that you needn't be an expert in every subject - one of the great things about homeschooling is that you can learn together with your child. Instead, it's more important that you have a good general knowledge of the history of the subjects being taught.

In most cases, a good "history of" on the subjects you plan to teach should be sufficient. Because it is impractical to read an entire bibliography for multiple subjects, you want to instead read a couple books on each subject that provide you with a good homeschooling starting point. In other words, you're not going to be an expert, but you're going to know the general concepts and be able to answer basic questions. Most importantly, you'll know which writing to explore further if you and your child's interest takes you in that direction.

The amount that you have to read will depend of course on your child's age and the level and depth of the subjects you'll be teaching, but a good starting point is to read a standard book that a high school student would have to read for a given subject. Remember that specific areas of a subject can be explored as you go, so you needn't be able to answer every question your child might have in depth before you start. Instead, you need a good knowledge of the history of the subject, so you can arrange a curriculum that makes sense in a liner way: you want to know how the subject works, and how it is taught. You want to know the "building blocks" - what concepts to teach first, and how to build on those first concepts.

By reading widely in this way you'll arm yourself with the necessary tools for homeschooling your child effectively, and provide yourself with the basic knowledge from which you and your child can explore particular areas of subjects further.

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Homeschool And Grade Your Child

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 245)
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How great must a parent feel spending time with her child at home, see her grow, discover and explore the world! Be all the way with her during her learning and explorations.

In America, homeschooling has been gaining popularity due to several reasons given by parents or they have seen the applicability to their child's unique situation. But, laws pertaining to this new alternative approach to education vary from state to state and there are different interpretations to it by school districts.

Homeschooling does not mean bringing school to home because it will defeat the purpose of homeschooling which is to enjoy learning and have more time to socialize outside rather than spend the day at school and at night they bury themselves in their homework.

Often, this choice of educational approach is decided by the family due to certain unique situations like special children in the family. Others just simply want to be a hands-on parent to his or her kids' learning and explorations.

In engaging to homeschooling, there are certain things you need to sacrifice like your time and finances. It will be taxing and would take too much of your time as a mother. No more pilates or yoga class for the moms or even office outside the home. For the breadwinners, it will be financially constraining because homeschooling is very expensive.

But try to weigh the benefits from the disadvantage of homeschooling your child:

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How To Schedule Your Homeschooling Day And Have Time To Spare

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 410)
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When creating a homeschooling schedule, areas of instruction, student age, and family schedule should all be taken into consideration. These three things should be integrated to come up with a schedule that will benefit children and adults alike. There is no need, however, to redesign the wheel. Use tools available to you to come up with a schedule that meets your needs.

The first step in creating a homeschooling schedule is to develop a mission statement. Take a few hours to sit down, write and rewrite a statement of purpose for your homeschool. Consider these questions: what do you want your children to learn? What can you provide through homeschooling that your child cannot get through a regular education setting? What traits do you want to promote in your child? Writing a mission statement will guide your instruction and scheduling choices.

Once you have a mission statement, it is time to do some research. Collect information on the topics you plan to teach, and the developmental level of your child. The internet is a valuable tool for this type of research. To make things easier, you may want to refer to the teaching standards laid out by your state for the appropriate grade level. They have done the research for you. Use these standards compared to your mission statement to add and delete topics that you would like to be a part of your curriculum. For example, if religion is something you feel strongly about, you might add that topic of study to your states standards. Or you might incorporate it into already existing standards such as, teaching about people who have made a difference, or use religious works as part of a cultural study or reading material.

With a mission statement and instructional content, you can now begin to schedule your instructional week. With a weekly calendar in front of you, first set down meal, snack and nap times appropriate for your child and/family. Next add in regular necessary family activities, such as weekly trips to the grocery store, sports practice, or church commitments. Keep in mind that these activities can be tied into current studies and become part of the learning environment. Decide how many hours a day you wish to devote to instruction, and what time is reasonable to begin each day. Finally divide the time between subjects. It is generally accepted that at least 2-2

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Who Said Homeschool Is For Kids Only It S For Highschools Too

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 454)
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They say homeschooling is only for the younger kids in the elementary or lower levels but highschool homeschooling is also a very popular educational choice. Only this time, the decisions are most probably through the convincing power of the students themselves.

Most that do homeschooling are those teenagers who cannot take the pressures at school, especially those of peer pressure and bullying. Others cannot catch up with the lessons and curriculum programs of regular schools or would like to start early in life through training, internship and community volunteering jobs that would help them be knowledgeable and prepared for the struggle outside the four walls of their school.

This is why choosing the suitable curriculum for teenagers or highschool is very important. There are a lot of materials or support they can get especially on the Internet. They can talk to other homeschoolers in established groups through message boards, forums and chats to build a network. Homeschooling sites are also all over the net; they can browse through these sites, find an established support group in their area, get some catalogs and enroll in a curriculum or they can create their own study program.

This is good for those students who have very supportive and open-minded parents. But in case there are none and the student is left to carry out his curriculum by himself, homeschooling helps students to stand up and depend on themselves because one thing that is developed within is good independent study skills and more as they engage in continuous studying on their own.

In choosing the homeschool curricula, it is best if teenagers are present and take an active part in deciding which curricula to choose that would best apply to their learning styles and abilities. Better for teenagers is to create their own course of study. In this way, students will have good choices of activities which develop every aspect of their personality instead of just choosing a fixed program. Anyway, there are different approaches to choose from and combine that would help in the holistic development of the student.

For highschool, homeschooling can help them start in life, make a step forward through practical trainings and internship programs depending on the specialization they like to pursue. Computer based jobs like developing software, designing a web, database administration, graphics and multimedia designs, repairs and troubleshooting are very popular among the choices of training and specialization. These are the jobs that most students who hate school like the most.

So, why force them in fixed school curricula when they can actually be successful in what they want and might do best in the future.

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Homeschooling While You Shop

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 469)
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Yes, It can be done! We are all busy juggling multiple tasks at once, and it does not get any easier when you are homeschooling. Here is an idea to get your children to help out with a chore and provide them with a learning opportunity at the same time.

Before going to the grocery store, ask your children to help you with a shopping list. You can go around the house - the fridge, pantry, and the bathroom cabinet, etc.- and categorise the list. You can also go through the flyer and see what's on sale and check on the price differences from one store to the another. (You can also discuss distribution channel and marketing for older kids.) Bring a calculator (if your kids prefer doing math that way) for your shopping trip.

Once you are at the grocery store, let the children do the shopping while you supervise. Show them how to select items based on the quality and/or price. While you are comparing the price, do a quick math lesson, or if you buy multiple of one item, what the total price differences would be. In the produce section, discuss where fruits and vegetables are from, and why you find thing from that particular climate. You can also talk about environment and organic produce. Have children weight vegitables and ask them how much a pound and a half of grapes would be.

In the meat and seafood section, discuss where they come from, how they keep them fresh, and what would happen if they are not kept cold. Many seafood items are imported, so you may discuss geography. If you are cooking a roast that day, you may have the children use the meat themometer and determine how cooked it is, and if it is safe to eat.

While you are in line at the check out counter, take out your coupons and ask them how much you can save if you use the double coupons. If you buy 3 Klenex tissue boxes on sale for $3, and have $.75 off coupon, how much would each box costs? How about if you get "buy one get one free" can of soup for $2.50 and have $.50 off coupon?

Don't forget to recycle those soda cans and talk about aluminum, recycling, and environment! On the way home, talk about how much gas you used for what distance, and how you can save money and environment by reducing the number of trips you take each month. Why is the gas so expensive? Where does the oil come from? How about the new hybrid cars? If the kids are done talking, you can listen to a CD and complete you day with a music lesson!

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Homeschooling 101 Grading Your Child S Work

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 722)
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Homeschooling is slowly becoming a trend for some families. It has many advantages, from the academic, social, moral to the religious point of view while several parents cite other child-centered reasons (like their children's health or safety). These reasons (or a combination of them) have been what most homeschooling families are giving out when asked why homeschool.

Perhaps most homeschooling families enjoy the flexible time homeschooling gives them and the interaction they can have with their children. There are, of course, certain difficulties and questions regarding homeschooling. One of them is regarding grading your children and keeping them up to par with most colleges' standards.

The real question most parents want answered is why they need to bother grading their children's homeschooling. The answer is simply because you may want to know if your children are learning something and if they are at par with children their age.

There are several ways you could find out if your child is learning or progressing in his or her lessons. One is through simple tests or exercises you can find in books. Another is through standardized exams you can find online or with the help of school officials that you know. Standardized tests help you find out if your children are doing fine and are at par with their peers. Standardized tests come as subject-specific tests and testing your children with these exams will help you determine what subjects they need to give more attention to, if there are any at all.

Grading your children's progress includes giving exams or tests and most, if not all, children find tests as a waste of time. This is a very important factor to look into. Most parents find other alternatives or how to make an exam more enjoyable for children. Some of the alternatives include mixing playing with testing. Another alternative is to give rewards (such as seeing that new movie) whenever a child gets a perfect score in an exam. There are several alternatives and it's up to you to play to what you think will make your child happier.

Another factor that could help you decide if your children need to take these tests is if you think they need to experience them. Most colleges require a rigorous standard type of exam (meaning college aspirants are pressured with regards to time) and children who haven't experienced being pressed for time might have some difficulties passing these kinds of tests.

Another factor to be looked at is how the test results will be used. Tests are designed mainly to find out if your children need more help with one area of one subject and where they excel the most. That is not the sole reason though. Other reasons include knowing how your children react to pressure and failure or success. These are important things to evaluate as they influence your children, especially their values.

Another reason is to find out if your children learn from their mistakes. This can be a good gauge of your children's progress and be a proof that they are indeed learning with homeschooling.

Another factor for your decision is how teachers and school officials view testing. They will definitely have different ideas and different sides with regards to the need to test your children. Other school officials will probably cite the need to monitor the progress of your children and knowing where they need help and where they can excel. Other officials will have a different opinion stating that testing should not be done as tests and exams are not the only gauge and way to monitor one's growth. Both sides will have strong arguments and listening to their sides might help you on deciding which side is right.

Of course, there are parents who do one-on-one homeschooling (meaning they personally teach their own children) that find testing their children is unnecessary. It is because most of them are seeing the progress of their children up close. They can see where their children are having an easy time and what subjects they need more time with. It is one of the advantages of teaching your own child rather than hiring paid help but you should also realize that there are other things you can't teach your children that they may need to know.

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A Complete Guide To The Different Learning Theories

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 729)
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Educational theorists, from philosophers like Socrates and Rousseau to researchers like Howard Gardner today, have addressed theories of learning. Many of their ideas continue to influence homeschoolers as well as traditional educators. A little familiarity with some of the ideas most popular among homeschoolers will help you make sense of the wealth of available materials when you begin to make choices for your family.

Jean Piaget and Cognitive Development

He proposed that children go through several distinct stages of cognitive growth. First comes the sensorimotor stage (birth to two years), during which the child learns primarily through sensation and movement. At the pre-operational stage (ages two to seven), children begin to master symbols such as language and start to be able to form hypotheses based on past experiences. At the concrete operational stage (ages seven to eleven), children learn to generalize from one situation to similar ones, although such reasoning is usually limited to their own concrete experience.

Finally, at the formal operational stage (eleven years older), children can deal with abstractions, form hypothesis and engage freely in mental speculation. Although the rate at which children progress through the stages varies considerably, the sequence of stages is consistent for all children.

Therefore, to be appropriate and effective, learning activities should be tailored to the cognitive level of the child.

Rudolf Steiner and the Waldorf Schools

Steiner divided children's development into three stages: to age seven, children learn primarily by imitation; from seven to fourteen, feelings and emotions predominate; and after age fourteen, the development of independent reasoning skills becomes important. Waldorf education tends to emphasize arts and crafts, music, and movement, especially at younger ages, and textbooks are eschewed in favor of books the students make for themselves. Waldorf theories also maintain that the emphasis should be on developing the individual's self-awareness and judgment, sheltered from political and economic aspects of society until well into adolescence.

Montessori and the Prepared Environment

Italian physician Maria Montessori's work emphasized the idea of the prepared environment: Provide the proper surroundings and tools, so that children can develop their full potential. Montessori materials are carefully selected, designed to help children learn to function in their cultures and to become independent and competent. Emphasis is on beauty and quality, and that which confuses or clutters is avoided: Manipulative are made of wood rather than plastic tools are simple and functional, and television and computers are discouraged.

Charlotte Mason: Guiding Natural Curiosity

Charlotte Mason was a nineteenth-century educator advocated informal learning during the child's early year contrast with the Prussian system of regimented learning then in vogue. She recommended nature study to develop both observational skill and an appreciation for the beauty of creation and extended that approach to teaching history geography through travel and study of the environment rather than as collections of data to master. She felt children learn best when instruction takes into account their individual abilities and temperaments, but she emphasized the importance of developing good habits to govern one's temperament and laying a solid foundation of good moral values.

Holt and Unschooling

Educator John Holt wrote extensively about school reform in the 1960s. Although he originally proposed the word "unschooling" simply as a more satisfactory alternative to "homeschooling." Unschooling now generally refers to a style of homeschooling, in which learning is not seperated from living, and children learn mainly by following their interests. Children learn best, he argued, not by being taught, but by being a part of the world, free to most interests them, by having their questions answered as they ask them, and by being treated with respect rather than condescension.

Gardner and Multiple Intelligences

Psychologist Howard Gardner argues that intelligence is not a single unitary property and proposes the existence of "multiple intelligences." He identifies seven types of intelligence: linguistic, musical, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily kinesthetic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal. Because each person has a different mix of these intelligences, learning is best tailored to each individual's strengths, rather than emphasizing the linguistic and logical-mathematical approaches traditionally used in schools. A bodily kinesthetic learner, for instance, might grasp geometric concepts presented with hands-on manipulative far more easily than she would if they were presented in a more traditionally logical, narrative fashion. A teaching approach that recognizes a variety of learning styles might encourage many individuals now lost by conventional methods.

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Home Schooling For Today S Children

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 415)
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In recent decades, homeschooling, or the traditional practice of educating children within the home as against sending them to a public or private learning institution, is slowly making its way back to the educational mainstream.

This alternative means of elementary and high school education dates back to 1906 in the United States when the Calvert Day School in Baltimore, Maryland offered the "curriculum in a box" partnered with a National Geographic advertisement. Shortly after its fifth year, almost 300 children employed Calvert's instructional materials for homeschooling. Almost a century later, this method, alongside many other methods and materials developed, spread like wild fire not only within the U.S. but also to 90 other countries all over the globe.

Notable home-schooled personalities include, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Dakota Fanning (famous Hollywood child actress), Christopher Paolini (book author), Sho Timothy Yano (an American boy of prodigious intelligence), Lynx and Lamb Gaede (the girls of Prussian Blue).

Through history, the methodology with which homeschooling is carried out have proven to be effective. However, as times change, so do the needs and requirements of the learners change. With this, certain modifications are required of the conventional homeschooling methods. Something more stimulating, more motivating, and worthwhile to encourage today's children to learn and explore.

Looking through the vast resources available on the world wide web under the subject of home-schooling, it could be seen that there has been so much improvement on how homeschooling is done through its century long history. From the crude and very simple methods and materials, new ones that are more sophisticated and complex have become available.

Fresh ideas are readily offered on how lessons should be planned for children of varying ages. Suggestions for fun activities are also presented to always keep the homeschooling atmosphere exciting and something to be looked forward to by the children. It is understandable that kids have shorter attention spans that may usually be a deterrent in keeping their interest in sitting down and listening to a lesson. Taking this into consideration, doing fieldtrips to museums, libraries, even zoos might just do the trick for the little tykes.

In general, the conventional methods and techniques of homeschool need not always be applicable to all settings and apt for each child. Modifying these conventional methods by throwing in some fresh ideas for exercises and activities in such a way that suits the learner's needs the best should always be regarded.

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The Abc S Of Home Schools

(category: Homeschooling, Word count: 594)
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There is no doubt as to how technology revolutionized the way people live today. Many things that were unthinkable in the past are now parts of reality. One of the things that proved difficult in the days gone by is the system of homes schools. Before, studying at home was a luxury that only the elite, rich people can afford. Hiring private tutors were the only possible means of doing education at home. But now with a more standardized system of education coupled with the many possibilities afforded by technology, learning from homes schools is very possible indeed.

The most crucial and critical part when engaging in homes schools is the decision to study at home. For many people, home education is education may rather be the only option especially for those who have physical disabilities or security issues. However, the option of studying at home is now extended to most anyone. Nevertheless, the decision to gain education from homes schools is a very difficult one to make, something that is to be taken seriously. The advantages of learning from regular schools with regular classmates and teachers are quite obvious. Bur for some, such benefits have to be given up for certain reasons. Before delving into home education one should first carefully think if it is the appropriate thing for one's situation. It is important to weigh all pros and cons of studying at home before making the final choice whether to pursue it or not.

Once the decision to engage in homes study, it is then important to prepare one's self for this endeavor. First the home where the education will take place should be carefully arranged and organized in a way that would make it conducive for studying and learning. Afterwards it is important to make the proper arrangements with the school that would be providing the education system at home. Not all schools are open for home education and it is thus important to source out different educational institutions in one's area.

When the arrangements with the school has been made, it is then important to identify with that school to keep the student's mind focused. A home student should feel as close as possible as to how a regular student would feel in the campus. This can be done by obtaining materials that are associated with schools, such as ID cards, school colors and emblems and the like. It is then also important to set up a schedule that should be followed by the home student strictly. It is usually beneficial to set the schedule in accordance to the schedule of the partner school, this way the home student would be synchronized with his or her peers. The record keeping system should also be prepared as this is very important in observing the home student's progress.

Part of the preparation for homes schools is learning and understanding the laws that govern this type of education. Each state have their own detailed information for homes schools and it is necessary to learn these details. It is also important to choose a good curriculum for the home student to follow. It is best to consult partner schools regarding the current curriculum trends in one's area, to ensure that the home student learns enough at least to get by.

Home schooling is a unique educational experience. It can be difficult for many, but if prepared very well, it can be a valuable mode of learning which can be comparable to regular schooling.

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