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Public Speaking The First 3 Minutes

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 484)
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This is it! You've landed your first Public Speaking engagement. You've have prepared and rehearsed. You are all ready to give your best presentation ever.

As you begin you have exactly 3 minutes of your presentation to grab the audience attention and build rapport to ensure they buy in to what you have to say.

In the first 3 minutes of your presentations, your audience is sizing you up. They are deciding whether they like you and whether are you worth listening to. If you lose your audience in the first 3 minutes you will be playing catch up for the rest of the presentation.

Why at the first 3 minutes of your public speaking engagement is most important period of your presentation? This is the time where the attention of the audience is naturally high and focused. Here is where the audience decides to hear you out or not. First Impression counts and you have only one chance at it.

In this crucial period you need to build rapport with your audience. Rapport is a prerequisite for effective communication. Before presenting any material you must build rapport with your audience.

When people are like each other, they like each other. When you have enough rapport with your audience, they will feel acknowledge and engage with you in your presentation.

You can build rapport with your audience by;

- Using the words they use. Use their Jargon's and preferred terms.

- Use the same tonality and say it like they do

- Use the same gestures and postures.

People create bonds with each others by finding shared experiences. Tell a story to your audience which relays to them that you are exactly like them. Meet as many of your audience before the presentation and build rapport with them individually.

Right form the start let your audience define their own expectation and do your best to meet those expectations. Experiment with different types of openers to see which builds more rapport for you and with your audience. Be flexible, use as many different openers and evaluate your results. The openers which build more rapport with your audience for you will be the best ones. The types of openers that you can look into are;

o Current Events

o Humorous

o Pictorial

o Anecdotal

o Pertinent Quote

o Real-World Situation

o Rhetorical

o Musical

If you have built enough rapport with your audience in the first 3 minutes of your presentation the rest of your presentation will move smoothly. You will have an engaging audience and you will be able to have fun with them and be yourself on stage.

Remember the first 3 minutes of your presentation is the most crucial of all. Start off your presentation with the right foot.

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Why It S Worth Fighting Your Dragons And Start Public Speaking

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 774)
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Everyone hears about being nervous when speaking, and when you overcome it, you

become confident and very successful.

What you don't hear from successful speakers is about the journey itself.

For example, when I started in the field of speaking, I was a corporate employee.

As a project engineer, I had to develop concepts and designs to solve problems within the plant.

I was good at this and yet my career progress was slow because I simply couldn't speak well,

and I needed to present my proposals to obtain funding.

I would become nervous, tongue tied and confused.

So when I started my public speaking career I was so scared and terrified, that even the

thought of being in front of a group of people, made me feel physically sick, and would

make my heart race so much, I thought I was having a heart attack.

Clearly, I didn't want to go through my life like that so I did some training and got ready

for my Maiden speech.

With this speech I was competing for a prestigious Silver Cup and I was excited because

I thought I was going to win it.

I walked out onto the stage in front of 200 people and arrived at the podium.

Suddenly my legs started to shake so much I thought I was going to fall down.

So I grabbed the lectern, which also began to shake, and then, at that moment, the butterflies

in my stomach turned into dive-bombers and I started to feel sick.

While shaking the lectern so much, I watched with horror, as my notes slid onto the floor.

In total confusion now, I decide to start my speech without picking up the notes.

My voice quavered as I stated my name, and then my mind went completely blank.

After what seemed an eternity, I grabbed my notes from the floor and fled the stage.

All I achieved that day was to let people know who I was and that I was one pathetic speaker.

Needless to say , I didn't get the prize or even a polite or sympathetic applause from the audience.

It was such a horrifying experience that I had to make a decision to quit or do something about it.

(I was unable to get into the witness protection program to lose my identity!)

Well I studied, practised and used everything that I write about in my book and then some

12 months later, I had to give a speech on behalf of my company.

Now this was a seriously major important speech for the company and me.

If I didn't do a brilliant job, my career would finish, the company would suffer and I reckon

I would have been out of a job.

That would mean, a massive change in lifestyle for my family, changing schools, changing

houses and even putting my food supply at risk..

So as I walked to the Podium this time I could feel this huge pressure bearing down on me.

And do you know?

I was confident, created humour and had them laughing, created pathos so they could feel

sad, lifted them with excitement, spoke a very clear message, had them in the palm of my hand

and when I finished ,they stood up to applaud.

Pretty good eh?

Oh yes, I got promoted and realised that day, that being a great public speaker helps you make

more money, no matter what your job is.

So what made the difference?

What transformed me from bumbling idiot to charismatic speaker?

And could anybody do the same?

Clearly, the answer is yes, if they went through all the stuff they I had.

Why am I qualified to say this?

Because it is based upon my learnings, my studies, my experiments, good and bad, and

most importantly, on my real life, in the fire, under the hammer, experience.

And then I even wrote my own book on how to overcome the Fear of Public Speaking!

As Chairman of the Public Speaking Group at the Australian Institute of Management I have

coached and helped many people who at the beginning of the year , could not even say their

name, and by the end of the year, had become articulate and confident speakers.

So overcoming the fear and building the skills, step by step, not only transforms your

presentation skills, it builds your confidence in all parts of your life.

And isn't that a good enough reason to start!

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Public Speaking The Key Is In The Body Language The 8 Stages To A Successful Presentation

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 354)
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Most people have a fear of speaking to a large group. This is a totally normal apprehension. People may visualise the audience laughing at them, or shouting out. This is an extremely rare occurrence, unless you are a politician.

Most people listening to you are aware of the pressures you are under and would never change places with you.

These guidelines will help you to overcome your fears.

1. Know your subject. Read through your presentation beforehand. Read around the subject, so that you are confident that you know more than your audience, even after you have spoken. If you know your subject then you will come across in an interesting way and keep the attention of your audience.

2. Expect to do well. Your expectations are obvious in your body language. If your audience sees that you expect to do badly, you will do badly. Expectation is vital.

3. Look at your audience. Eye contact is vital if you are to judge their understanding so that you can change the pace of your delivery if necessary.

4. Use notes. You should never, never read your speech from a sheet.

5. Slow your speech down. This makes you appear more confident and enables your audience to take it in more easily. If you are talking slower, it is easier for your audience to maintain their attention, and momentary lapses in their concentration mean that they miss less.

6. Vary the tone and level of your voice. This maintains interest. You should speak clearly and project your voice, rather than shouting. Talking quietly in key segments means that your listeners will need to actively listen to those parts of your presentation.

7. Avoid excessive body movements and gestures. Hand gestures can be used for emphasis only.

8. Keep your hands and thumbs visible. Holding your hands out, with the thumbs uppermost is a very powerful dominance gesture. Watch politicians speaking, they all use this gesture.

9. Rejoice in the endorphin high that you will feel when it goes well.

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Eulogy Speeches Use A Story To Help You Get Started

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 366)
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So you "have" to do a eulogy speech... or maybe you "want" to get a chance to express in public all the deep feelings you have for your loved one who has passed away.

Yes, I know it's a tough time to write a eulogy speech or anything else for that matter. Yes, I know you're probably distraught and having a hard time focusing. That's OK. I'm going to give you an easy tip to get going. Where do you start?

One of the best elements to include in a eulogy is a story about you and an interaction you had with the deceased. Your eulogy story could be funny or heart-wrenching. In fact, a mixture of both in the same story is great, or you could do one of each. There is no law that states you can only tell one story.

Your eulogy could start with a story about how you met your loved one, or maybe you could talk about your earliest remembrance of them when you were a child. You could talk about a really great life lesson you learned from them and how it has helped you in your life.

Another great thing about using eulogy speech stories is that you don't have to read or memorize your words because you lived the experience.

All you have to do is make a brief bullet point in your notes that would say something like, "Tell farm story", or whatever will briefly remind you of the story you want to tell.

There are many other points you need to know about writing a eulogy speech, but using a story to help you get started will take away some of the pressure in creating a great tribute to your loved one.

About Author : Tom Antion is a speech expert and author of "Instant Eulogy Speeches".This book gives complete instructions for writing a eulogy speech quickly and easily even when you are upset. It also includes many loving phrases and paragraphs you can copy and paste into your finished eulogy along with more than a dozen pieces of appropriate humor to ease the tension.

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The Barriers That Stop Most People Presenting In Public How To Overcome Them

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 790)
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Gerald R. Ford said "If I went back to college again, I'd concentrate on two areas: learning to write and learning to speak before an audience. Nothing in life is more important than the ability to communicate effectively."

It's the number one skill that's guaranteed to position you head and shoulders above the competition, yet it's frequently overlooked, according to female speaker, Patricia Fripp.

My own take on having the ability to speak well in public is that it's probably the single most powerful thing you can learn to do that gives you the ammunition to say "If I can do that, I can do anything".

If you've ever marvelled at the abilities of a great presenter, the clever use of words to draw pictures, the confidence and charisma that exudes from the platform and the awe in which they are held, you'll agree with the above statements.

So why is it that when it comes to attending training courses, presentation skills are not the automatic first port of call? Could it be to do with that oft quoted (probably misquoted) statistic that speaking in public is feared more than death? Let's not go into an examination of quite how ridiculous that would be if it were true. After all, how many of you would really swap places with the guy in the coffin if you were asked to speak at a funeral?

There's no doubt that public presenting can get the old palms sweating, but given the benefits you'll get when you know you can do it well, it really shouldn't stop you. Let's examine the causes of nerves so you lay your fears to rest and get this most important of abilities added to your arsenal of talents, shall we?

First, examine why you're nervous. There's always a reason for nerves so examine what the reasons are so you can deal with the cause and go a long way to eliminating the symptom. Note that I say "go a long way to eliminating", the chances are that you'll always feel some nervousness which is when you need to remember that nerves are your friends because they keep your senses sharp & show that you want to do well.

Even seasoned performers suffer from stage fright, some had it so bad they could barely perform. Fortunately, the thought is usually worse than the task. Once you get started, you'll often find that your nervousness will disappear. I liken it to knowing that you're about to tackle a drive round London's Hyde Park Corner or Paris's Arc de Triomphe in rush hour. Thinking about it really freaks you out but when you're in the middle of it, you're too busy concentrating on not hitting anyone that it's only afterwards you get to think "Wow, I made it in one piece."

Some of the most common reasons I've found for people suffering from nerves are these:

-Worry about forgetting what you're going to say

-Worry that the audience will think you're a fraud

-Worry about saying the wrong thing and offending somebody

-Worry that someone will ask a question to which you don't know the answer

-Worry that you'll get a dry mouth or get tongue tied

-Worry that you'll finish too soon or run long

Some of the less common ones I've heard were "I'm worried in case there's a fire alarm halfway through my talk" and "I'm worried that the hem on my trousers will unravel in front of everyone whilst I'm speaking."

I could dismiss all these are "silly" or "invalid" and tell you that none of them will ever happen, but the fact is that they often will. (Yes, even the trouser hem thing's happened to me!). Looking down the list, you can see that there's a lot you can do to avoid these situations occurring: being well prepared, stating your qualifications in your introduction, knowing your subject matter inside and out, timing yourself several times during rehearsals, and so on (sorry, I don't have a magic bean to disable fire bells during speeches).

But so what if any of them still come to pass? What's the worst that can happen? Well it's not life or death, you know. You have to learn to keep your fears in perspective. And remember, the audience wants you to succeed. Nobody enjoys a bad speech.

Do what you can to be prepared and don't let fear of speaking stop you from gaining that most revered of all skills, the one that will impact every area of your personal and business life. Give yourself the very best opportunity of succeeding and you'll find the rewards are massive.

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How To Hire The Perfect Keynote Speaker

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 343)
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Establish the date, location and budget of your event. These factors will play an important role in determining the pool of keynote speakers available to you. Your date, for example, will affect which keynote speakers are available, whereas your budget will limit whom you can and can't afford to hire. In order to save on the cost of the keynote speaker's travel, you may want to consider the distance between where he or she resides and where your event will take place.

Determine the type of presentation you want and the time of day when it will take place. Some speakers are skilled at delivering workshops, while others excel at providing keynotes. After-dinner speakers should incorporate humor into their talks, where morning speakers should be energizing.

Clarify why you want to hire a keynote speaker. Some common reasons include the desire to:

Educate

Motivate

Shift behavior

Initiate a change effort

Raise funds

Promote a cause or organization

Entertain

Consider which keynote speakers have been successful in the past with your group or a group similar to yours.

Call your friends and associates. Asking for references can be a great way to narrow down your search. BigSpeak can locate any keynote speaker for you whether you see them on our roster or not.

Establish who the core decision makers are regarding a keynote speaker and tap into their vision.

Consider the demographics of your audience. Do you need a keynote speaker who will appeal to a general audience or one who will interest a specific demographic group (e.g., an all-women's group)?

Avail yourself of BigSpeak!'s agents' expertise. We have helped thousands through the process of choosing just the right keynote speaker for their event and are happy to lend you our ear and ideas. What's more, our services are free. We are motivated to get you the best keynote speaker for your event because our aim is to keep you coming back to BigSpeak! for all of your keynote, training and consulting needs.

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Conquer Speaking Fear 5 Tips

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 339)
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Reduce your fear of speaking by taking the following steps.

1) Conduct Research.

Visit or call key participants to ask them what they expect from your presentation. That is, what do they want to learn from it? What do they already know about this topic? How will your presentation help them? Such conversations enlist these people as your allies during your presentation. It also helps you learn what people expect, so that you can deliver it. This is like collecting the answers to an exam before taking it.

2) Prepare.

Write an outline, and if possible write a script for key parts of it (such as the opening and close). Then practice giving your presentation, without reading the script until you know it so well that you can deliver it conversationally. Avoid trying to memorize a script. That makes things too complicated and difficult. Practice your speech anywhere and at any time. For example, you can talk through parts of it while jogging, working on chores, or taking a shower.

3) Rehearse.

Practice your talk in the meeting room with a group of friends, coworkers, and (if possible) your boss. Ask for their comments on how to improve your talk. Also, use this as an opportunity to become familiar with the room and any equipment, such as a projector.

4) Be the Host

Arrive early so that you can meet and greet the attendees before your presentation. Shake their hands and thank them for coming. Introduce yourself to them and engage them in small talk. (e.g., "How are you?") Act as if they were guests coming to your party. This converts them from strangers into friends.

5) Expect Success

Fantasize doing a wonderful job. If you let nightmares run through your mind, you will scare yourself. Give yourself confidence by expecting to do well. Know that everyone wants you to do an excellent job.

The key to success is being prepared. It helps you do a better job and fills you with confidence.

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9 Tips To Keep Your Audience In Attention

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 522)
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In almost all gatherings (conventions, alumni homecomings, commencement exercises, fund raising or awarding ceremonies), guest speakers are usually invited to highlight the occasion.

To make the gathering memorable, guest speakers are selected for a certain reason, some according to their popularity and accomplishments.

As much as possible, the speaker's profession or line of achievement must be in some way related to the occasion.

Let's say the occasion is a convention of home developers. The likely guest speaker to grace it could be a famous housing czar well known and respected by the city and state.

To impart a lasting impression to the audience, a speaker must find ways to keep the attention glued to his speech.

If it so happens that you are the invited guest speaker of a gathering, the suggestions below may help to keep your audience listening instead of walking around or doing something else.

1. Speak in a clear, crisp, comprehensible voice with an enthusiastic tone. Avoid mumbling. Try not to eat the words as if there's a gum in your mouth.

2. Your speech should be in consonance with the aim of the gathering, touching on issues relevant to its objective and applicable to current needs for the benefit of the majority.

3. More speakers prepare a list of the issues they want to touch on instead of a speech prepared and read (or memorized) word for word. A spontaneous speech aligned on the ideas prepared or written on the list is projected more naturally.

4. Inject humor into your speech to keep the audience attentive and waiting for more. Studies reveal that, when humor is involved, audiences find the speaker interesting to listen to. But be aware not to go beyond the line of humor because this may unintentionally embarrass others or be misunderstood by them. This might raise comments that criticize your speech. Try your best to avoid criticism.

5. When you raise an issue, one of the best ways to project it is by citing instances or examples. Correlate the example and the issue clearly.

6. Suppose the gathering was organized to save an industry or boost the morale of those that will be directly and indirectly affected by it. Try your best to deliver an inspiring speech. A speech filled with positive thoughts, like projecting a bright tomorrow, can turn a depressive mood into an enthusiastic one. If you are well versed on the industry with a solution to offer to suppress its downtrend, then say it.

7. Audience participation may seem to turn your speech into a discussion, but it is one way to confirm effectiveness of what you are saying or offering.

8. Image how the industry will look like 5 or 10 years from now on a positive flight. Be specific and realistic in your projection. If hard work is called for, say so.

9. Leave a lasting, meaningful message as you wrap up your speech.

A speech that leaves the audience thinking long after the speech has been made will also leave the audience remembering the speaker for a long time.

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How To Communicate In His Love Language

(category: Public-Speaking, Word count: 541)
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Are you wondering how to communicate with that new man in your life? Or maybe you are just wondering about the next man in your life? New or old, it's never too late to learn how to communicate in the language of love.

Maybe you've seen the tomboyish girl that somehow has men flocking around her. If you stopped turning green with envy for a moment, you'd notice why she was a man magnet. She just sort of fit herself into him, like a piece of a jigsaw puzzle that he didn't even know was missing.

Instead of rolling your eyes at that dazed and happy-in-love look he has on his face, why not look into how she did it? Learn these tips on how to communicate in a whole new way by getting to know his love language and speaking it fluently!

We all know that love is built on the solid foundation of communication. When we are in love we are on the same page as our lover. It's a special level of communication that people in love have.

Some call it chemistry, but really, in order to even get to the chemistry stage you need to know his love language. For a clue as to what that might be, we need to understand how he relates to the world around him.

Everyone perceives their world with three senses - sight, sound and feelings. Psychologists have discovered that even though we use all three senses, one of these senses is always more pronounced. It doesn't mean that it replaces the others, but if you pay attention, the more dominant one will reveal itself to you.

Asking questions is the easiest and fastest way to learn his language and since asking questions is the most common way to get to know someone or start a conversation, he'll never suspect.

He's just returned from a business trip. You ask about his trip. Pay attention to his answer:

1. If he's visual he might say: the weather was terrible. I didn't get to see the sun once!

2. An auditory guy will talk about sounds: we got the account, which was good. But the hotel I stayed at was too noisy.

3. He is a feeler if he answers something like: I have to admit; I'm not much into traveling alone. I get lonely when I visit new places.

Knowing a man's love language is the key in how to communicate with him in a way that will make him feel that you are the missing piece to his puzzle. You'll just fit. Of course, one question isn't going to tell you. You'll have to watch for a pattern to emerge.

Once you do find the prominent sense, you'll want to speak his language. Talking with your visual man will be all about what you saw on the way over, while the auditory fellow will want to know about the new CD you just bought.

It doesn't matter what your love language is. As long as you know how to communicate to him in his Love Language you'll soon be the envy of all the other girls. That is, unless you tell them your secret.

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