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Top 2 Reasons Why Motorhomes Are The Wave Of The Future

(category: Recreational-Vehicle, Word count: 344)
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Did you know that motorhomes have been gaining rapidly in popularity over the last few years? It's true. If you've driven on the freeways recently, you might have noticed that there are an awful lot of people taking to the roads of America in their new homes on wheels (motorhomes). This country is huge and so are the number of attractions that you could see in a motorhome. Motorhomes have always been popular among the more mobile of our population, but recent models have shown that manufacturers have been producing incredible automotive works of art. Here's the 2 reasons why motorhomes are the wave of the future.

1)Retirement. There is a huge amount of the US population that is considering retiring in the next few years. Baby boomers have worked all their lives and have been spending their money like there is no tomorrow on all sorts of travel accessories. Motorhomes are no exception. One of the biggest things that all retirees want to do after they finish work is travel. Motorhomes provide future domestic travelers with lots of transportation options. Seeing the country (or even the world) in style is possible with a motorhome.

2)Cheap Mobility. Let's be honest here, gas prices are expensive. They've been expensive and probably will remain so for a long time. However, 2 or more people traveling in a motorhome can see a lot of things for relatively little money. Imagine how much money it would cost you in airplane tickets to fly to each destination individually? A lot more than the gas it costs to navigate from city to city. A tank of gas, financially, doesn't go as far as it used to, but it certainly isn't that bad considering all the place it can take you.

There is a lot more to motorhomes than just what's been covered here. In fact, there is a ton more of material available out there about motorhomes. Get informed before deciding to invest in a motorhome.

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Deciding On The Purchase Of A Motor Home

(category: Recreational-Vehicle, Word count: 481)
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The purchase of a motor home isn't to be taken lightly. There are several different types of "motor homes" on the market and each one is different in size, features and price.

The best known type of motor home is the recreational vehicle. This is known as a Type A motor home. The roomiest of motor homes, the largest and therefore the most expensive. Motor homes come in sizes up to 45 feet. They come with all the luxurious amenities you could imagine. Some have washer and dryer, hardwood floors, granite counter tops, luxury leather furniture, plasma TV's with satellite, custom stained glass and some even have large garden tub/showers. They range between $85,000 used and $400,000 for a new motor home. They generally get between 5 and 8 miles per gallon. Some of the newer larger models get around 5 miles per gallon. These sleep up to six people.

A Type B motor home category includes van campers and travel trailers. The van campers generally range from 18 feet to 22 feet in length and can comfortable sleep four. A fully contained van camper can have a shower, toilet, kitchen, TV, couches and beds. The beds are closer together affording less privacy. Most only have enough head room to allow for full standing in the center of the vehicle. Much smaller than the Type A motor homes they have less storage area. The van campers range in price between $43,000 and $70,000.

Travel trailers come in sizes 16 feet to 38 feet. The range in price from $6,000. for a used trailer upwards to $45,000 for a new travel trailer. You can generally find a fairly wide range of amenities in travel trailers. The larger the size the more you can sleep and the more likely you will be to have a private bedroom area.

A lot of travelers like the fact that they can park their trailer in a trailer park and take their vehicle touring the area. It does however take lots of practice learning how to properly drive with a travel trailer hitched to the back of your SUV.

Talk with friends and family who already own motor homes. One of the first things to do is to decide what type of traveling you and your family are most likely to do. Do you plan to spend one week vacationing in one spot? A travel trailer might be for you. Do you plan to visit a different spot each day, overnighting in different areas? Then a recreational vehicle might be for you. However, if the price of gas and the thought of filling up a 100 gallon gas tank on a vehicle that gets 5 to 8 miles per gallon isn't for you, you may want to re-think the choice of a recreational vehicle.

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Rv Awnings Options To Add Comfort To Your Vacation

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RV awnings add something extra to the experience of travelling and spending time in different areas of the country. You might think that putting up an awning each time you stop takes away time from your vacation, but once you see the awnings suitable for RVs, you will want to buy one. You can find these awnings for sale at retailers that specialize in the sale of awnings and at retailers that deal in RV sales. If something should happen to the RV awning, you won't have any difficulty finding replacement parts. If you own an RV, you owe it to yourself to check out the line of RV awnings.

Once you install RV awnings, you can leave them there. You simply winch them in and out by hand or by pushing a button if you have a motorized awning. For RV's, retractable awnings operate by means of a 12 v battery, so you don't need an electrical hook up to use one. You can also get an RV awning replacement that has lighting included, which makes for the ultimate outdoor setting when you stopped for the night. Enjoy your meal outdoors in the dark or enjoy the beautiful sunset from under the shade of your awning.

The canopy support of RV awnings is well able to withstand the force of the wind and the weight of water from the rain. The material won't sag or flap in the wind keeping you awake all night. There are manufacturers that use the Awnbrella technique that blows the awning upwards, thus eliminating any possibility of sagging. This also helps avoid the problem of looking for an RV awning for sale or a replacement part when the fabric in your awning sags too much.

If you choose Awnbrella as your choice in RV awnings, you will have an aluminum awning made of anodized extruded aluminum. The high temperatures used in creating this type of RV awning for sale ensure that it won't rust and will resist corrosion from the weather. You do need to have poles to keep this RV awning from sagging and experts recommend that you do not place the posts on the ends of the canvas. The total weight of the poles is only four pounds, which means you won't have any difficulty getting them in place when you stop for the night.

RV awnings help to reduce the heat and humidity inside the RV by as much as 70%. They help to make your motor home a more comfortable place to spend a vacation when you can relax outdoors under the awning and not have to worry about the UV rays of the sun. You can get RV awnings for just about any size of camper and if you have problems there are RV awning replacement parts available as well. However, chances are you won't need to look for those for a long time.

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Diesel Motor Home Vs Gasoline Motor Home

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When considering the purchase of a motor home, one needs to decide whether to buy gasoline (petrol) or diesel. Essentially, there will be very little difference between the two in terms of the interior comforts and road performance, however, there are differences that one needs to consider before making a purchase.

To begin with, price is going to be a consideration since diesel motor homes will cost more than motor homes run on gasoline. There are new super chassis gasoline models available (Ford and GM) which present excellent buying. They have excellent carrying capacity and are less expensive than diesel. Alternatively, some of the more popular diesel motor homes include, Monaco, Newmar, Holiday Rambler and Fleetwood.

Oil and maintenance are also considerations when deciding whether to purchase a diesel motor home or gasoline model. Generally, oil changes and maintenance are less expensive on the gasoline models with an oil change on a diesel motor home costing between $175-$250. However, diesel motor homes tend to ride quieter because the engine is in the rear on most. Another advantage that diesel motor homes have over standard gasoline models is the cargo carrying capacity. Diesel models can carry more cargo and this includes heavier materials in the interior of the motor home such as Corian counter tops, china toilets etc.

Additionally, diesel motor homes usually have superior transmissions and pac brakes. These are important considerations if you intend to do a lot of mountain driving. Another important factor to consider when buying a motor home is the longevity of the vehicle. Diesel motor homes tend to run forever whereas in the long run, gasoline motor homes will generally require much more maintenance.

So there you have it! Make sure that you fully understand the fundamental differences between a diesel motor home and a gasoline motor home before making your purchase. You will also need to research a variety of companies who offer these motor homes for sale to ensure that you are paying the right price for your vehicle. Whether you decide to go diesel or gasoline, the flexibility that motor homes bring to your holiday adventures will be both exciting, flexible and extremely comfortable.

To access more information on motor homes click on the link in the resource box or go to: www.motorhomessite.com

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Buying An Rv Take Some Advice

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I fancy buying an RV darling. Ok Honey, go out and get one and we can spend all our vacation time in it and have great fun. Wrong, very wrong. Do not buy an RV if this is how you are thinking. Your RV will just be a waste of money.

Buying an RV is an important decision and something the whole family needs to be involved in. An RV is also an investment, an investment in time and cost but you will not see a profit on an RV, well not in financial terms but it can have a huge payback in terms of satisfaction and enjoyment but if you just rush out and buy an RV without giving it a lot of thought then it could be, at best, an expensive waste of money, and an RV can be, at worst, a marriage breaker. I know as I have seen it happen.

When we were trading up to a larger and newer RV, my sister in law from Atlanta decided she was going to buy our old RV. The trouble was it was her idea and not a joint family decision. She had been on vacation with us a few times and liked the lifestyle, thought it would be great for her daughter to spend more time in the countryside but she never really considered if her husband wanted an RV. He was the type who would choose a sports car to drive without thinking of where his daughter was going to sit. He liked speed, acceleration and easy maneuvering, not something you tend to find with an RV. It lasted a few years with him being unhappy with all his vacations in the RV, he bumped into a few trucks and did some damage to the RV, (which I had to repair), and was just generally unhappy with the whole idea of having a vacation in an RV. It got to the stage of seriously damaging their marriage. What went wrong? Well my sister-in-law did not sit down and really think about an RVer's lifestyle.

Think about it, RVs can be small, they can be cramped compared to your house, RVs can be hard to drive and you can end up spending all your vacation just driving around. What she should have done is to rent an RV first to try things out. This way she could easily have seen if owning an RV was going to work.

So what do you look for when renting an RV.? Well I would think the most important is where it is at. Pick the area you would like to vacation in and they look for somewhere to rent one from. Think about how you are going to get there. Driving allows you to take more things with you than flying, so if you are flying then you may need to make sure that you rent an RV which comes fully equipped as some do not have things such as kitchen utensils in them or towels and so on, although many companies will supply these but sometimes they come at a price.

What about the size of your RV from small to large. I suppose this depends on what you want to achieve. If you are a family then you need a larger RV and so on. Just make sure that everything you need is available but remember this may mean extra rental cost. Do you want to tow a car behind your RV.? Some companies will let you, some will not and if you are in a hire car, does the hire company allow it to be towed behind an RV. Is the RV you want to rent capable of towing a large car or only a small car? These questions could go on but the best people to answer them are the RV rental company you are dealing with. They are the RV experts so ask them.

I could go on with information like this but it is just commonsense. Think about where you are going to vacation in your RV, think about how to get there, think about your RV in terms of size, think about the equipment you need for your RV, think about pets in the RV if you have a pet and think about who to rent your RV from. Get several quotes from RV rental companies and then compare them and read the fine detail to see what you get for the price and what extra you need to spend.

Once you have done all this pick a suitable RV to rent and a suitable company to rent your RV from and then just do it. Once you have tried renting an RV you will then have a much better idea if being an RV owner is for you and can then make the commitment to buy an RV Good luck and just enjoy it. I do.

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Lemon Laws May Not Cover Recreational Vehicles

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Although the price of gasoline continues to climb upwards, Americans still love driving recreational vehicles. They are big and bulky, and get poor gas mileage, but the convenience of driving a vehicle that also contains some of the comforts of home is appealing, particularly since an RV will allow you to stay in national parks and other campgrounds. Why stay in a hotel when you can stay by a lake? A recreational vehicle does offer vacation opportunities that other types of transportation, such as sport utility vehicles, do not. But like any other vehicle, an RV can break down, and when it does, the repairs can be expensive. They can be even more expensive if you are unprepared for something that many RV buyers don't know - the lemon laws of most states do not cover recreational vehicles.

Recreational vehicles are not cheap; the price tags of some of them can exceed one million dollars. But while they are legally motor vehicles, most states exempt them from coverage under the lemon laws. Lemon laws are statutes designed to provide consumers who buy defective motor vehicles with recourse against the manufacturer should the vehicle prove repeatedly unreliable. Given the fact that RVs tend to be rather expensive, one would think that they would be covered under these laws, but in most states, that's not the case. Why not?

Unlike most cars, which are mass-produced by the millions, RVs are mostly assembled by hand. Not only that, but the parts tend to be made by a number of different companies. The drive train might be made by an auto manufacturer, and the body and living quarters might be made by several other companies. There is really no single manufacturer to hold responsible for vehicle defects. A handful of states have some coverage for RVs, but those that do tend to cover only the drive train, and not the living quarters of the vehicle. If you have a transmission problem, you may have recourse under the lemon law. If the stove quits working, the problem is your responsibility.

If you are planning to buy an RV, you should take precautions to minimize the likelihood of problems:

Check your state's lemon laws to see if the type of vehicle you plan to buy is covered.

Look at vehicles from a number of different manufacturers and examine the warranties offered with the vehicles carefully. You may wish to consider purchasing an extended warranty, if one is offered at the time of sale.

Do some research on past reliability of the type of vehicle you are thinking about buying. If that manufacturer has a history of problems, you may wish to consider buying from a different company.

See if the vehicle carries the seal of the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association. This seal means that the manufacturer belongs to an industry group that requires its members to meet a set of safety standards that includes more than five hundred items.

Owning a recreational vehicle is a lot of fun and can make vacations enjoyable. The last thing you want, however, is to spend your vacation at home while the RV is in the shop. Remember, your state's lemon law will probably not protect you.

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Get Your Own Collectible Motor Home

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In the 1970's, General Motors entered the RV market. Drawing on the exuberance of the times, the company set out to create the ultimate American Motor home. Their aim was to produce a top-of the-line vehicle with cutting-edge design and construction, not just another competitor in the already crowded vacation vehicle market. The common design in this era was a boxy, ungainly and top-heavy unit on a truck chassis. The GMC vehicle was intended to be a completely new design in every way. Design work began in 1970, with the market introduction planned for 1973. "Doesn't look like a box or ride like a truck" was the GMC ad slogan.

The new vehicle would be unusual for this era in several ways. First of all, it was to have a front wheel drive, a rare concept in cars of that day and unheard-of in mobile homes. The drive train and suspension were taken from the design of the Oldsmobile Toronado. The 265 horsepower 455 cubic inch Oldsmobile engine was attached to a Turbohydramatic 425 transmission with torsion bar suspension. The rear suspension was a product of GM's bus design, using dual swing arms, one leading and one trailing, with a single air spring on each side. Instead of a auto body steel, the body was to be made of lightweight aluminum and molded fiberglass-reinforced plastic such as was used in the Chevrolet Corvette.

The front wheel drive and independent swing arm rear suspension brought great improvement to the standard motor home design. The lack of drive shafts and axles underneath the coach allowed a very low floor height, leading in turn to a low overall vehicle height and lower center of gravity. Aside from easier entry and exit, this reduced rollover risk and wind resistance and made the vehicle much safer and easier to operate for buyers accustomed only to car driving. A six-wheel braking system, with disc brakes on the front and drum brakes on all four rear wheels, further enhanced drivability.

Previous motor home design focused mainly on the use of the vehicle as a temporary home once it had reached its destination, an extended stay in a mobile home park or a camping spot. Ease of getting to the destination was of secondary concern, and cumbersome handling on the road was taken for granted. GMC made a special point of targeting this feature for improvement by adding visibility from the driver's seat with a panoramic expanse of glass.

The motor home was featured in 23 foot and 26 foot lengths, fairly small even for this era. Nowadays, much larger models are common. The motor home's interior design was compact, with no permanent sleeping areas in the original design. All beds were converted from seating areas when required.

Hot water was provided by water heaters using engine coolant loops, which produced water so hot it could actually present a scalding hazard since coolant temperatures usually exceed 200 degrees Fahrenheit. The refrigerator was powered by a standard automotive battery, adequate only for overnight use before recharging.

The prototype was first displayed in May 1972 at the Transpro '72 trade show in Washington, D.C. Production started in 1973 with two models, Model 230 and Model 260, 23 and 26 feet long respectively. They were sold with a finished interior for the public as well as unfinished to other RV manufacturers such as Avion and Coachman, who then provided their own interiors before reselling to consumers. 30 different floor plans were available, and models were priced from $35,000 to $40,000.

The GMC vehicle changed slightly over time, the most notable alteration coming in 1977 when the 455 cubic inch engine was replaced by a 403 cubic inch model in response to the energy crisis. This decade caused hardship for all RV manufacturers as the increased price of fuel pushed large gas guzzling vehicles out of the market. The GMC motor home had never sold at high volumes, and the company decided that the RV production facilities could be more profitably used to make light trucks. After the manufacture of 12,921 vehicles, production of motor homes was discontinued after the 1978 model year.

Almost immediately after production ceased, GMC motor homes became collectors' items, with owners' associations being established to provide parts and service for these vehicles. Small manufacturers and garages developed a cottage industry servicing them. In 1992, as General Motors prepared to scrap all remaining tools and parts, Cinnabar Engineering purchased all the motor home manufacturing supplies and negotiated a deal to continue to provide parts for the discontinued vehicles. In 1992, a monthly magazine called GMC Motor home Marketplace was introduced, and in 1994 Cinnabar started publishing a quarterly newsletter called GMC Motor home News.

The vehicle's futuristic design has even found a place in pop culture: Mattel Toys created die-cast versions of the GMC motor home for its Hot Wheels line. More than 50 different GMC Hot Wheels are available, and in 1977, Mattel released three toy GMC versions in a Barbie Doll Star Traveler promotion.

In an amazing example of customer loyalty and product durability, more than 8,000 units are still registered by owners. An internet search of "GMC Motor home" produces 771,000 results, as sites advertise motor home parts, engines and upgrades as well as classic car rallies for owners. Used GMC motor homes sell for $10,000 to $15,000 depending on the condition of the vehicle.

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Camping In A Rv For Fun And Pleasure

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Camping for most people means a tent and sleeping on a mat on the ground. If that doesn't really appeal to you, then camping in an RV is what you need. It is the ultimate camping adventure.

RV's come in many sizes and shapes. They start with campers that fit in the back of a pickup truck. These can have full kitchens, beds, a shower and toilet in them.

Next there are van conversions called Class B motorhomes that are basically a cargo van converted into a camping vehicle. These can have a raised roof for more head room. They also contain the same amenities as the truck camper.

Next up is the Class C motorhome. The front end looks like a pickup truck, but the similarity ends there. There is a sleeper extension over the cab and the back end looks like any motorhome you are probably familiar with. Basically a cargo box with windows, but much prettier. The Class C has all the amenities of home. A kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and living room. You could live in a Class C.

The next step us is the Class A motorhome. This is roomiest of all motorized RVs. These motorhomes are like a mini one bedroom apartment. They are fully self contained. From the queen sized bed to the dinette that seats four people you find luxury. A refrigerator and stove are complimented by a microwave oven. You might even have an ice maker capable of making over 20 pounds of ice a day. Party ready!

If that weren't enough choices, there are still the trailers. First is the travel trailer you can pull behind a larger sedan or SUV. Then the 5th wheel trailer that hooks into the back of a pickup truck. Both of these trailers are equally as luxuriant as the best motorhome. An advantage is they cost a lot less.

You can buy new or used. Whichever way you choose, you should do a lot of research on the internet first. Learn all you can about RVing. There are RV forums that you can find by doing a search in your favorite search engine.

When you decide that an RV might be for you, attend an RV show or two. There are major RV shows at fairgrounds and stadiums where many dealers and vendors are selling every type of RV there is. There are also local RV shows usually put on by one or two dealers to show and sell some of their inventory.

If you really are not sure you would like to spend $40,000 or $250,000 on a hobby you are not sure you would like, buy a used RV. You can get into RVing in a 34 foot used Class A motorhome for under $10,000.

The older and larger the motorhome the less fuel efficient it will be. You may get 5 to 7 miles per gallon on many older motorhomes. 7-9 mpg is realistic for mid 1990's motorhomes and up to 12 miles a gallon on new ones.

Camping in an RV is a fun adventure awaiting you and your family.

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Types Of Motor Homes

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Motor homes are categorized into several different types. We have reviewed in earlier articles Type A, the recreational vehicle. Then we reviewed Type B motor homes, these are the van camper and travel trailer.

Type C motor homes are often called mini-motor homes. These often have the same amenities of larger motor homes, and can be ordered with quite luxurious amenities, but these mini-motor homes are much easier to handle on the road than the larger recreational vehicle. Type C mini-motor homes range in price between $5,000 and $20,000 used and up to $65,000 used.

Another type of motor home is what is called the 5th Wheel. This is the "L" shaped trailer you see being pulled by large pick up trucks. These are also available for those who can afford them with luxurious amenities and design. As with the travel trailer these 5th wheel motor homes can be parked in a camp ground and you have your vehicle to do exploring with.

A very popular family motor home is a truck camper. They are often very inexpensive ranging between $8,000 and $22,000 new. These work well for those that are single, or parents and kids. They are basic in design and function.

A lot of families use pop ups for camping. These are essentially a tent on wheels and are a great first step for those thinking about Rving. These pop-ups can sleep from two to eight people. They usually have some type of small kitchen, stove top and sink and storage. The disadvantage is that you have less room and less protection from the elements due to the fact that you have screening and canvas as protection.

Talk to family and friends who have RV's. Go to RV shows in your area and check out the different models of motor homes and recreational vehicles for yourself.

Decide what type of vacationing you will be doing. Are you going to be vacationing in one area or are you going to be exploring a different area each day and staying in different places each night? What time of year are you going to be vacationing? Certainly a pop up wouldn't be your warmest choice for a winter vacation. What is your gas budget? Can you afford to fill the 100 gallon gas tank of a recreational vehicle that gets 5 to 8 miles per gallon? Do you have to be more cost conscious? In that case a mini-motor home may be for you.

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